AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

Are Catholics exempt from jury duty?

Jesus tells us not to judge others. Does this mean that we should avoid jury duty or working as judges?

Jesus' words are meant to remind us that we cannot know what other people are thinking and feeling. In fact, we cannot even know what people are doing, as appearances are often deceiving. God is the ultimate judge of us all.

That does not mean we have no duty to help maintain order, justice, and peace in society. If all Christians were to abandon roles in law enforcement and the judicial system, the result would be disastrous.

Catholics should take all their civic duties—including jury duty—seriously.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, February 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/11/2013


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New for Lent!
Take a fresh look at Lent with St. Francis as your guide.
New for Lent!
Make the most of Lent and experience it through the lens of discipleship. 
New for Lent!
Scott Hahn brings you Lenten reflections from a Father who keeps his promises.
New book
Learn what the New Evangelization means for you!
New book
Discover the Bible's stories and mine its wisdom.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
World Day of Prayer for the Sick
Use this economical service anytime to communicate with housebound friends and relatives.
Carnivale
Create a festive atmosphere and invite friends over for one last party before the Lenten fast.
St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.
National Marriage Week (U.S.)
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.
St. Valentine's Day
Schedule one or more e-cards today to be sent next Thursday.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic