AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Seasonal
Saints
Special Reports
Movies
Social Media
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

Are Catholics exempt from jury duty?

Jesus tells us not to judge others. Does this mean that we should avoid jury duty or working as judges?

Jesus' words are meant to remind us that we cannot know what other people are thinking and feeling. In fact, we cannot even know what people are doing, as appearances are often deceiving. God is the ultimate judge of us all.

That does not mean we have no duty to help maintain order, justice, and peace in society. If all Christians were to abandon roles in law enforcement and the judicial system, the result would be disastrous.

Catholics should take all their civic duties—including jury duty—seriously.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, February 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/11/2013

Mark: Most of what we know about Mark comes directly from the New Testament. He is usually identified with the Mark of Acts 12:12. (When Peter escaped from prison, he went to the home of Mark's mother.) 
<p>Paul and Barnabas took him along on the first missionary journey, but for some reason Mark returned alone to Jerusalem. It is evident, from Paul's refusal to let Mark accompany him on the second journey despite Barnabas's insistence, that Mark had displeased Paul. Because Paul later asks Mark to visit him in prison, we may assume the trouble did not last long. </p><p>The oldest and the shortest of the four Gospels, the Gospel of Mark emphasizes Jesus' rejection by humanity while being God's triumphant envoy. Probably written for Gentile converts in Rome—after the death of Peter and Paul sometime between A.D. 60 and 70—Mark's Gospel is the gradual manifestation of a "scandal": a crucified Messiah. </p><p>Evidently a friend of Mark (Peter called him "my son"), Peter is only one of the Gospel sources, others being the Church in Jerusalem (Jewish roots) and the Church at Antioch (largely Gentile). </p><p>Like one other Gospel writer, Luke, Mark was not one of the 12 apostles. We cannot be certain whether he knew Jesus personally. Some scholars feel that the evangelist is speaking of himself when describing the arrest of Jesus in Gethsemane: "Now a young man followed him wearing nothing but a linen cloth about his body. They seized him, but he left the cloth behind and ran off naked" (Mark 14:51-52). </p><p>Others hold Mark to be the first bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. Venice, famous for the Piazza San Marco, claims Mark as its patron saint; the large basilica there is believed to contain his remains. </p><p>A winged lion is Mark's symbol. The lion derives from Mark's description of John the Baptist as a "voice of one crying out in the desert" (Mark 1:3), which artists compared to a roaring lion. The wings come from the application of Ezekiel's vision of four winged creatures (Ezekiel, chapter one) to the evangelists.</p> American Catholic Blog Moodiness is nothing else but the fruit of pride.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New for Lent!
Take a fresh look at Lent with St. Francis as your guide.
New for Lent!
Make the most of Lent and experience it through the lens of discipleship. 
New for Lent!
Scott Hahn brings you Lenten reflections from a Father who keeps his promises.
New book
Learn what the New Evangelization means for you!
New book
Discover the Bible's stories and mine its wisdom.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
World Day of Prayer for the Sick
Use this economical service anytime to communicate with housebound friends and relatives.
Carnivale
Create a festive atmosphere and invite friends over for one last party before the Lenten fast.
St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.
National Marriage Week (U.S.)
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.
St. Valentine's Day
Schedule one or more e-cards today to be sent next Thursday.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic