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Daily Catholic Question

Are Catholics exempt from jury duty?

Jesus tells us not to judge others. Does this mean that we should avoid jury duty or working as judges?

Jesus' words are meant to remind us that we cannot know what other people are thinking and feeling. In fact, we cannot even know what people are doing, as appearances are often deceiving. God is the ultimate judge of us all.

That does not mean we have no duty to help maintain order, justice, and peace in society. If all Christians were to abandon roles in law enforcement and the judicial system, the result would be disastrous.

Catholics should take all their civic duties—including jury duty—seriously.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, February 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/11/2013

Columban: Columban was the greatest of the Irish missionaries who worked on the European continent. As a young man who was greatly tormented by temptations of the flesh, he sought the advice of a religious woman who had lived a hermit’s life for years. He saw in her answer a call to leave the world. He went first to a monk on an island in Lough Erne, then to the great monastic seat of learning at Bangor. 
<p>After many years of seclusion and prayer, he traveled to Gaul (modern-day France) with 12 companion missionaries. They won wide respect for the rigor of their discipline, their preaching, and their commitment to charity and religious life in a time characterized by clerical laxity and civil strife. Columban established several monasteries in Europe which became centers of religion and culture. </p><p>Like all saints, he met opposition. Ultimately he had to appeal to the pope against complaints of Frankish bishops, for vindication of his orthodoxy and approval of Irish customs. He reproved the king for his licentious life, insisting that he marry. Since this threatened the power of the queen mother, Columban was deported to Ireland. His ship ran aground in a storm, and he continued his work in Europe, ultimately arriving in Italy, where he found favor with the king of the Lombards. In his last years he established the famous monastery of Bobbio, where he died. His writings include a treatise on penance and against Arianism, sermons, poetry and his monastic rule.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus was never a careerist or a glory-monger; he did not demand to be hailed as a king or lauded as a hero. He came to live among us, to suffer with us, and to serve us from the heart. He came to teach us how to love.

The Spirit of Saint Francis

World Day of Prayer for the Sick
Use this economical service anytime to communicate with housebound friends and relatives.

Create a festive atmosphere and invite friends over for one last party before the Lenten fast.

St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.

National Marriage Week (U.S.)
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.

St. Valentine's Day
Schedule one or more e-cards today to be sent next Thursday.

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