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Daily Catholic Question

Are Catholics exempt from jury duty?

Jesus tells us not to judge others. Does this mean that we should avoid jury duty or working as judges?

Jesus' words are meant to remind us that we cannot know what other people are thinking and feeling. In fact, we cannot even know what people are doing, as appearances are often deceiving. God is the ultimate judge of us all.

That does not mean we have no duty to help maintain order, justice, and peace in society. If all Christians were to abandon roles in law enforcement and the judicial system, the result would be disastrous.

Catholics should take all their civic duties—including jury duty—seriously.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, February 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 2/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/11/2013


Anselm: Indifferent toward religion as a young man, Anselm became one of the Church's greatest theologians and leaders. He received the title "Father of Scholasticism" for his attempt to analyze and illumine the truths of faith through the aid of reason. 
<p>At 15, Anselm wanted to enter a monastery, but was refused acceptance because of his father's opposition. Twelve years later, after careless disinterest in religion and years of worldly living, he finally fulfilled his desire to be a monk. He entered the monastery of Bec in Normandy, three years later was elected prior and 15 years later was unanimously chosen abbot. </p><p>Considered an original and independent thinker, Anselm was admired for his patience, gentleness and teaching skill. Under his leadership, the abbey of Bec became a monastic school, influential in philosophical and theological studies. </p><p>During these years, at the community's request, Anselm began publishing his theological works, comparable to those of St. Augustine (August 28). His best-known work is the book <i>Cur Deus Homo</i> ("Why God Became Man"). </p><p>At 60, against his will, Anselm was appointed archbishop of Canterbury in 1093. His appointment was opposed at first by England's King William Rufus and later accepted. Rufus persistently refused to cooperate with efforts to reform the Church. </p><p>Anselm finally went into voluntary exile until Rufus died in 1100. He was then recalled to England by Rufus's brother and successor, Henry I. Disagreeing fearlessly with Henry over the king's insistence on investing England's bishops, Anselm spent another three years in exile in Rome. </p><p>His care and concern extended to the very poorest people; he opposed the slave trade. Anselm obtained from the national council at Westminster the passage of a resolution prohibiting the sale of human beings.</p> American Catholic Blog There is one more important person you must forgive: yourself. Many times we think we’ve sinned so badly that God can’t let us off the hook so simply. But His mercy is simple, and it is open to all hearts that turn to Him.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
World Day of Prayer for the Sick
Use this economical service anytime to communicate with housebound friends and relatives.

Carnivale
Create a festive atmosphere and invite friends over for one last party before the Lenten fast.

St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.

National Marriage Week (U.S.)
During this week especially tell each other how much your marriage means to you.

St. Valentine's Day
Schedule one or more e-cards today to be sent next Thursday.




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