AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Seasonal
Saints
Special Reports
Movies
Social Media
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

If Jesus was Jewish, why don’t Catholics follow Jewish teachings?

In fact, Catholics do follow many Jewish teachings, such as the Ten Commandments. Catholic Sunday Masses almost always include a reading from the Hebrew Scriptures and a Psalm response.

The Mass prayer, “Blessed are you, Lord, God of all creation. Through your goodness we have this bread [wine] to offer...,” comes from Judaism.

When a second-century Roman priest said that the God of the Hebrew Scriptures was not the same as the God of the New Testament, the Catholic Church described such teaching as heresy. Jesus was born Jewish and cannot be understood apart from Judaism.

Jesus also preached about a Kingdom of God which is open to Jews and non-Jews (gentiles). The Letter to the Ephesians says that Christ broke down the wall between Jews and gentiles, reconciling both with God (2:11-17).

Some Jewish people accepted that teaching while others did not. Those who did so became Christians, willing to call Jesus the Son of God. Not surprisingly, other Jews felt such a title undermined the absolute bedrock of Judaism, their belief in one God.

For the first 40 years after Jesus’ death, many people thought of Christianity as a group within Judaism. As the Good News spread, so many gentiles were baptized that eventually they became the majority.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Friday, February 01, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/31/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 2/2/2013

Gianna Beretta Molla: 
		<p>In less than 40 years, Gianna Beretta Molla became a pediatric physician, a wife, a mother and a saint! </p>
		<p>She was born in Magenta (near Milano) as the 10th of Alberto and Maria’s 13 children. An active member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, Gianna earned degrees in medicine and surgery from the University of Pavia and opened a clinic in Mesero. Gianna also enjoyed skiing and mountain climbing.</p>
		<p>Shortly before her 1955 marriage to Pietro Molla, Gianna wrote to him: “Love is the most beautiful sentiment that the Lord has put into the soul of men and women.” She and Peter had three children, Pierlluigi, Maria Zita and Laura. </p>
		<p>Early in the pregnancy for her fourth child, doctors discovered that Gianna had both a child and a tumor in her uterus. She allowed the surgeons to remove the tumor but not to perform the complete hysterectomy that they recommended, which would have killed the child. Seven months later, Gianna Emanuela was born, The following week Gianna Beretta Molla died in Monza of complications from childbirth. She is buried in Mesero.</p>
		<p>Gianna Emanuela went on to become a physician herself. Gianna Beretta Molla was beatified in 1994 and canonized 10 years later.</p>
American Catholic Blog Countless souls choose not to honor Christ—in their behavior, works or speech—while alive, yet magically expect Him to honor them upon their death. Scripture confirms that’s not a good idea. Don’t wait. Go to God today.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New from Mark Shea
Learn how the Commandments and the Beatitudes can bring you a joyful life.
New book
Take a journey with Jesus and his ultimate disciple.
New audiobook
Be an envoy for Christ! Learn from Patrick Madrid, Catholic apologist for over 25 years.
The Catechism
Get an overview of this essential teaching tool of the Catholic faith.
Set Yourself Free
Let it go and learn how the power of forgiveness can set you free.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Catholic Schools Week
In the Catholic school, parents know that their children are being formed as well as informed.
St. John Bosco
Himself an educator, this saint is one of the patrons of Catholic schools and students.
Peace
End this month as you began the year. Share peaceful thoughts with friends and family.
Happy Birthday
No matter how you say it, wish them a happy birthday with a Catholic Greetings e-card!
Catholic Schools Week
This week we recognize and celebrate the contributions made to the U.S. through Catholic education.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic