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Daily Catholic Question

What is the papal tiara?

In its simplest form the papal tiara seems to have appeared about the third century. Over the years it became much more ornate and took on a kind of beehive shape.

The tiara came to consist of three crowns. According to James Charles Noonan, Jr., in The Church Visible, the bottom crown became ornamentation at the base of the miter in the ninth century. When the popes assumed temporal power, the base crown became decorated with jewels to resemble the crowns of princes. A second crown was added by Boniface VIII in 1298 to symbolize spiritual dominion. Very soon after, a third crown and lappets (cloth strips) were added.

According to Noonan, the triple tiara represents the pope’s universal episcopate, his supreme jurisdiction and his temporal power. It is also said to represent his role as priest, pastor and teacher.

In our century the tiara came to be regarded as inappropriate because of its ornateness and rich character. Pope Paul VI stopped wearing the tiara and sold his, using the funds for the poor.

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Friday, December 07, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/6/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/8/2012

James Oldo: You’ve heard rags-to-riches stories. Today, we celebrate the reverse. 
<p>James of Oldo was born into a well-to-do family near Milan in 1364. He married a woman who, like him, appreciated the comforts that came with wealth. But an outbreak of plague drove James, his wife and their three children out of their home and into the countryside. Despite those precautions, two of his daughters died from the plague, James determined to use whatever time he had left to build up treasures in heaven and to build God’s realm on earth. </p><p>He and his wife became Secular Franciscans. James gave up his old lifestyle and did penance for his sins. He cared for a sick priest, who taught him Latin. Upon the death of his wife, James himself became a priest. His house was transformed into a chapel where small groups of people, many of them fellow Secular Franciscans, came for prayer and support. James focused on caring for the sick and for prisoners of war. He died in 1404 after contracting a disease from one of his patients. </p><p>James Oldo was beatified in 1933.</p> American Catholic Blog Even when skies are grey and clouds heavy with tears, the sun rises. So to with our souls, burdened by life’s sins and still He rises.

 
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