AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Why were statues removed from churches?

When pastors and congregations began to implement the decrees of Vatican II, they often experienced a need to remodel and adapt their churches and worship spaces.

With the advent of concelebrated Masses and fewer side-altar celebrations, the need for side altars became less. With the emphasis on participation in the liturgy, proximity to the altar and visibility of the celebrant and ministers became important.

In the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy they were told to seek noble beauty rather than sumptuous display. The Constitution told them, “The practice of placing sacred images in churches so that they may be venerated by the faithful is to be maintained. Nevertheless, their number should be moderate and their relative positions should reflect right order."

In renovating churches and sanctuaries pastors were not acting in arbitrary fashion. They were carrying out the mandate of the Church. And if they were faithful to the demand of the Church, they did so with consultation from liturgists, artists and architects.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/3/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/5/2012


Feast of the Guardian Angels: Perhaps no aspect of Catholic piety is as comforting to parents as the belief that an angel protects their little ones from dangers real and imagined. Yet guardian angels are not only for children. Their role is to represent individuals before God, to watch over them always, to aid their prayer and to present their souls to God at death. 
<p>The concept of an angel assigned to guide and nurture each human being is a development of Catholic doctrine and piety based on Scripture but not directly drawn from it. Jesus' words in Matthew 18:10 best support the belief: "See that you do not despise one of these little ones, for I say to you that their angels in heaven always look upon the face of my heavenly Father." </p><p>Devotion to the angels began to develop with the birth of the monastic tradition. St. Benedict gave it impetus and Bernard of Clairvaux, the great 12th-century reformer, was such an eloquent spokesman for the guardian angels that angelic devotion assumed its current form in his day. </p><p>A feast in honor of the guardian angels was first observed in the 16th century. In 1615, Pope Paul V added it to the Roman calendar.</p> American Catholic Blog Nothing then, must keep us back, nothing separate us from Him, and nothing come between us and Him.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Little Way of Advent
New! Meditations for Advent in the spirit of St. Thérèse of Lisieux.
A Catholic Family Advent
New! Celebrate Advent as a family with these prayers and activities.
Sharing the Word
New! Scriptural reflections to guide you through the season of Advent.
New book!
Get a fascinating look inside Catholic apologetics from Patrick Madrid.
Hope and Help
Guidance and inspiration for living with illness.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Birthday
The day of your birth is an anniversary of life: celebrate!
St. Francis Xavier
This 16th-century Jesuit missionary spent much of his life bringing the Gospel to the peoples of Asia.
First Sunday of Advent
Before dinner this evening gather your family to bless the Advent wreath and light one purple candle.
World AIDS Awareness Day
An e-card from you will make someone's day. Let those who are ill know they're not forgotten.
St. Andrew
Legend says that this apostle, patron of Scotland, was crucified on an X-shaped cross.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014