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Daily Catholic Question

Is the Eucharist a symbol or reality?

The teaching of the Church is clear—with the words of consecration, Christ becomes really and truly present among us. The substance of the bread and wine is changed into the substance of Christ’s body and blood. The accidents and appearances of bread and wine remain, however.

Eating and drinking the consecrated bread and wine (the body and blood of Christ) symbolize or sign our unity with Christ. Sharing in the one bread and cup further signs our unity with each other in Christ. God’s gift of the Eucharist is a sign of his care and providence just like the manna in the desert.

The bread and wine, offered at the offertory, are signs of Christ who will become present in the gifts and of his sacrifice being recalled and represented to the Father in the eucharistic celebration.

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Monday, December 3, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/2/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/4/2012


John Vianney: A man with vision overcomes obstacles and performs deeds that seem impossible. John Vianney was a man with vision: He wanted to become a priest. But he had to overcome his meager formal schooling, which inadequately prepared him for seminary studies. 
<p>His failure to comprehend Latin lectures forced him to discontinue. But his vision of being a priest urged him to seek private tutoring. After a lengthy battle with the books, John was ordained. </p><p>Situations calling for “impossible” deeds followed him everywhere. As pastor of the parish at Ars, John encountered people who were indifferent and quite comfortable with their style of living. His vision led him through severe fasts and short nights of sleep. (Some devils can only be cast out by prayer and fasting.) </p><p>With Catherine Lassagne and Benedicta Lardet, he established La Providence, a home for girls. Only a man of vision could have such trust that God would provide for the spiritual and material needs of all those who came to make La Providence their home. </p><p>His work as a confessor is John Vianney’s most remarkable accomplishment. In the winter months he was to spend 11 to 12 hours daily reconciling people with God. In the summer months this time was increased to 16 hours. Unless a man was dedicated to his vision of a priestly vocation, he could not have endured this giving of self day after day. </p><p>Many people look forward to retirement and taking it easy, doing the things they always wanted to do but never had the time. But John Vianney had no thoughts of retirement. As his fame spread, more hours were consumed in serving God’s people. Even the few hours he would allow himself for sleep were disturbed frequently by the devil. </p><p>Who, but a man with vision, could keep going with ever-increasing strength? In 1929, Pope Pius XI named him the patron of parish priests worldwide.</p> American Catholic Blog The most beautiful and spontaneous expressions of joy which I have seen during my life were by poor people who had little to hold on to. –Pope Francis

Stumble Virtue Vice and the Space Between

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
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This 16th-century Jesuit missionary spent much of his life bringing the Gospel to the peoples of Asia.

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Before dinner this evening gather your family to bless the Advent wreath and light one purple candle.

World AIDS Awareness Day
An e-card from you will make someone's day. Let those who are ill know they're not forgotten.

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Friendship
“Blessed are You for giving us family and friends to rejoice with us in moments of celebration.”




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