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Daily Catholic Question

What’s a seraphic saint?

Sixth-century writer Dionysius the Areopagite drew on different scriptural texts to list nine choirs of angels: Seraphim, Cherubim, Thrones, Dominations, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels and Angels.

First in this hierarchy of angels are the Seraphim. An individual member of this group is called a Seraph.

It is a Seraph who appears in the story of how Francis of Assisi received the stigmata (the wounds of Christ’s passion) in his body.

Because of this experience and his burning love of God, Francis is often called the Seraphic Saint and some parishes and institutions are named St. Francis Seraph.

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Sunday, December 23, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/22/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/24/2012


Joseph of Cupertino: Joseph is most famous for levitating at prayer.
<p>Already as a child, Joseph showed a fondness for prayer. After a short career with the Capuchins, he joined the Conventuals. Following a brief assignment caring for the friary mule, Joseph began his studies for the priesthood. Though studies were very difficult for him, Joseph gained a great deal of knowledge from prayer. He was ordained in 1628.
</p><p>Joseph’s tendency to levitate during prayer was sometimes a cross; some people came to see this much as they might have gone to a circus sideshow. Joseph’s gift led him to be humble, patient and obedient, even though at times he was greatly tempted and felt forsaken by God. He fasted and wore iron chains for much of his life.
</p><p>The friars transferred Joseph several times for his own good and for the good of the rest of the community. He was reported to and investigated by the Inquisition; the examiners exonerated him.
</p><p>Joseph was canonized in 1767. In the investigation preceding the canonization, 70 incidents of levitation are recorded.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, help me to spread your fragrance wherever I go. Let me preach you without preaching, not by words but by my example, by the catching force, the sympathetic influence of what I do, the evident fullness of the love my heart bears for you. –Cardinal Newman

 
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