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Daily Catholic Question

How are the different kinds of angels ranked?

According to Ludwig Ott in Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, the division of angels into nine orders is not a truth of faith but a free theological opinion.

At the turn of the sixth century Pseudo-Dionysius, drawing on references to angels in the Scriptures, divided the angels into three hierarchies with three choirs in each hierarchy. That became the common teaching of theologians and the Church.

According to Adolf Tanquerey in A Manual of Dogmatic Theology, St. Thomas puts the Seraphim, Cherubim and Thrones in the first hierarchy. In the second are the Dominations, Virtues and Powers. The third is composed of Principalities, Archangels and Angels.

Tanquerey, following St. Thomas, says the "Seraphim excel in the supreme excellence of all, in being united to God through charity."

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Saturday, December 22, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/21/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/23/2012


Joan of Arc: 
		<p>Burned at the stake as a heretic after a politically-motivated trial, Joan was beatified in 1909 and canonized in 1920.</p>
		<p>Born of a fairly well-to-do peasant couple in Domremy-Greux (southeast of Paris), Joan was only 12 when she experienced a vision and heard voices that she later identified as Sts. Michael the Archangel, Catherine of Alexandria, and Margaret of Antioch.</p>
		<p>During the Hundred Years War, she led French troops against the English and recaptured the cities of Orléans and Troyes. This enabled Charles VII to be crowned as king in Reims in 1429. Captured near Compiegne the following year, she was sold to the English and placed on trial for heresy and witchcraft. Professors at the University of Paris supported Bishop Pierre Cauchon of Beauvis, the judge at her trial; Cardinal Henry Beaufort of Winchester, England, participated in the questioning of Joan in prison. In the end, she was condemned for wearing men's clothes. The English resented France's military success–to which Joan contributed. </p>
		<p>On this day in 1431, she was burned at the stake in Rouen, and her ashes were scattered in the Seine River. A second Church trial 25 years later nullified the earlier verdict, which was reached under political pressure.</p>
		<p>Remembered by most people for her military exploits, Joan had a great love for the sacraments, which strengthened her compassion toward the poor. Popular devotion to her increased greatly in 19th-century France and later among French soldiers during World War I. Theologian George Tavard writes that her life "offers a perfect example of the conjunction of contemplation and action" because her spiritual insight is that there should be a "unity of heaven and earth."</p>
		<p>Joan of Arc has been the subject of many books, plays, operas, and movies. </p>
American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand. It will convey your care for her and can have a calming effect. It says to the person, “You are appreciated, you are cherished, and you are not alone.”

The Gospel of John the Gospel of Relationship

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O King of the Nations” Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Radiant Dawn” Share your Christmas Eve plans with a Catholic Greetings e-card.

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Key of David” Send an e-card to celebrate the third week of Advent.

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Root of Jesse” Christmas is less than a week away! Take time now to schedule e-cards for delivery later this week.

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Lord” Use Catholic Greetings to remind friends of holiday get-togethers.




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