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Daily Catholic Question

What was the fate of Judas?

Concerning the fate of Judas, the following statement appears in Basics of the Faith: A Catholic Catechism, by Alan Schreck (Servant Books): “The Catholic Church teaches that we cannot judge or determine whether any particular person has been condemned to hell, even Hitler or Judas Iscariot. The mercy of God is such that a person can repent even at the point of death and be saved.”

An American Catechism
, edited by George Dyer (Seabury Press), however, says of despair that it seems to be: “Besides a distortion of faith itself, more a psychological and emotional crisis, perhaps generated by past sins, than a mortal sin in itself. Obviously despair is a grievous matter.

“But it is very difficult to conceive how a person who despairs could fulfill in this act the other conditions requisite for mortal sin. It is particularly difficult to believe that a person who despairs does so with full consent of the will or in a radically free act.”

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Sunday, December 2, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/1/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/3/2012


Giles: Despite the fact that much about St. Giles is shrouded in mystery, we can say that he was one of the most popular saints in the Middle Ages. Likely, he was born in the first half of the seventh century in southeastern France. That is where he built a monastery that became a popular stopping-off point for pilgrims making their way to Compostela in Spain and the Holy Land.<br /><br />In England, many ancient churches and hospitals were dedicated to Giles. One of the sections of the city of Brussels is named after him. In Germany, Giles was included among the so-called 14 Holy Helpers, a popular group of saints to whom people prayed, especially for recovery from disease and for strength at the hour of death. Also among the 14 were Sts. Christopher, Barbara and Blaise. Interestingly, Giles was the only non-martyr among them. Devotion to the "Holy Helpers" was especially strong in parts of Germany and in Hungary and Sweden. Such devotion made his popularity spread. Giles was soon invoked as the patron of the poor and the disabled.<br /><br />The pilgrimage center that once drew so many fell into disrepair some centuries after Giles' death. American Catholic Blog The ascension is about the final reunion of what appeared to be separated for a while: earth and heaven, human and divine, matter and Spirit. If the Christ is the archetype of the full human journey, now we know how it all resolves itself in the end. “So that where I am, you also will be” (John 14:3).

 
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