Skip Navigation Links
Catholic News
Special Reports
Google Plus
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Are there any feminine images of God in the Bible?

Is there a reference to the Holy Spirit as “mother eagle” in the Book of Isaiah? If so, where?

You may be thinking of Deuteronomy 32:11 which says, “As an eagle incites its nestlings forth by hovering over its brood, so he [God] spread his wings to receive them and bore them up on his pinions.” In fact, the eagle here is a mother eagle.

The Book of Isaiah has at least three references to God using feminine imagery: God’s anguish for the Israelites is like that of a woman giving birth (42:14); God cherishes them with a mother’s love (49:15); and “As a mother comforts her son, so will I comfort you” (66:13).

You can find more information about feminine images of God in Women and the Word: The Gender of God in the New Testament and the Spirituality of Women, by Sandra Schneiders (Paulist, 1986).

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/17/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/19/2012

Columban: Columban was the greatest of the Irish missionaries who worked on the European continent. As a young man who was greatly tormented by temptations of the flesh, he sought the advice of a religious woman who had lived a hermit’s life for years. He saw in her answer a call to leave the world. He went first to a monk on an island in Lough Erne, then to the great monastic seat of learning at Bangor. 
<p>After many years of seclusion and prayer, he traveled to Gaul (modern-day France) with 12 companion missionaries. They won wide respect for the rigor of their discipline, their preaching, and their commitment to charity and religious life in a time characterized by clerical laxity and civil strife. Columban established several monasteries in Europe which became centers of religion and culture. </p><p>Like all saints, he met opposition. Ultimately he had to appeal to the pope against complaints of Frankish bishops, for vindication of his orthodoxy and approval of Irish customs. He reproved the king for his licentious life, insisting that he marry. Since this threatened the power of the queen mother, Columban was deported to Ireland. His ship ran aground in a storm, and he continued his work in Europe, ultimately arriving in Italy, where he found favor with the king of the Lombards. In his last years he established the famous monastery of Bobbio, where he died. His writings include a treatise on penance and against Arianism, sermons, poetry and his monastic rule.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus was never a careerist or a glory-monger; he did not demand to be hailed as a king or lauded as a hero. He came to live among us, to suffer with us, and to serve us from the heart. He came to teach us how to love.

Oasis Conversion Stories of Hollywood Legends

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Lord” Use Catholic Greetings to remind friends of holiday get-togethers.

Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Wisdom” The liturgical countdown to Christmas begins today.

Third Sunday of Advent
Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light the rose candle along with two purple candles.

Visit anytime for a selection of Catholic e-cards for holidays, saints’ feasts and other occasions!

Send an e-card to celebrate the second week of Advent.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic

An Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015