AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Are there any feminine images of God in the Bible?

Is there a reference to the Holy Spirit as “mother eagle” in the Book of Isaiah? If so, where?

You may be thinking of Deuteronomy 32:11 which says, “As an eagle incites its nestlings forth by hovering over its brood, so he [God] spread his wings to receive them and bore them up on his pinions.” In fact, the eagle here is a mother eagle.

The Book of Isaiah has at least three references to God using feminine imagery: God’s anguish for the Israelites is like that of a woman giving birth (42:14); God cherishes them with a mother’s love (49:15); and “As a mother comforts her son, so will I comfort you” (66:13).

You can find more information about feminine images of God in Women and the Word: The Gender of God in the New Testament and the Spirituality of Women, by Sandra Schneiders (Paulist, 1986).

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/17/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/19/2012


All Saints: The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (<i>On the Calculation of Time</i>). 
<p>But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. </p><p>How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.</p> American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
A Mary Christmas

New! Have yourself a "Mary" little Christmas!

Preparing for Christmas
New! Daily meditations for Advent from Richard Rohr.
A Franciscan Christmas
Delve into the birthplace of Franciscan spirituality.
A Catholic Christmas
Celebrate with the Church and make this a Catholic Christmas!
New audiobook
Listen to reflections on Mary as a mother during the life of Jesus.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Lord” Use Catholic Greetings to remind friends of holiday get-togethers.
Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Wisdom” The liturgical countdown to Christmas begins today.
Third Sunday of Advent
Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light the rose candle along with two purple candles.
Advent
Visit CatholicGreetings.org anytime for a selection of Catholic e-cards for holidays, saints’ feasts and other occasions!
Advent
Send an e-card to celebrate the second week of Advent.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014