AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Are there any feminine images of God in the Bible?

Is there a reference to the Holy Spirit as “mother eagle” in the Book of Isaiah? If so, where?

You may be thinking of Deuteronomy 32:11 which says, “As an eagle incites its nestlings forth by hovering over its brood, so he [God] spread his wings to receive them and bore them up on his pinions.” In fact, the eagle here is a mother eagle.

The Book of Isaiah has at least three references to God using feminine imagery: God’s anguish for the Israelites is like that of a woman giving birth (42:14); God cherishes them with a mother’s love (49:15); and “As a mother comforts her son, so will I comfort you” (66:13).

You can find more information about feminine images of God in Women and the Word: The Gender of God in the New Testament and the Spirituality of Women, by Sandra Schneiders (Paulist, 1986).

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/17/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/19/2012


Matthew: Matthew was a Jew who worked for the occupying Roman forces, collecting taxes from other Jews. The Romans were not scrupulous about what the "tax farmers" got for themselves. Hence the latter, known as "publicans," were generally hated as traitors by their fellow Jews. The Pharisees lumped them with "sinners" (see Matthew 9:11-13). So it was shocking to them to hear Jesus call such a man to be one of his intimate followers. 
<p>Matthew got Jesus in further trouble by having a sort of going-away party at his house. The Gospel tells us that "many" tax collectors and "those known as sinners" came to the dinner. The Pharisees were still more badly shocked. What business did the supposedly great teacher have associating with such immoral people? Jesus' answer was, "Those who are well do not need a physician, but the sick do. Go and learn the meaning of the words, 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' I did not come to call the righteous but sinners" (Matthew 9:12b-13). Jesus is not setting aside ritual and worship; he is saying that loving others is even more important. </p><p>No other particular incidents about Matthew are found in the New Testament.</p> American Catholic Blog The most appealing invitation to embrace the religious life is the witness of our own lives, the spirit in which we react to our divine calling, the completeness of our dedication, the generosity and cheerfulness of our service to God, the love we have for one another, the apostolic zeal with which we witness to Christ’s love for the poorest of the poor.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
A Mary Christmas

New! Have yourself a "Mary" little Christmas!

Preparing for Christmas
New! Daily meditations for Advent from Richard Rohr.
A Franciscan Christmas
Delve into the birthplace of Franciscan spirituality.
A Catholic Christmas
Celebrate with the Church and make this a Catholic Christmas!
New audiobook
Listen to reflections on Mary as a mother during the life of Jesus.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Lord” Use Catholic Greetings to remind friends of holiday get-togethers.
Advent - "O" Antiphons
“Come, O Wisdom” The liturgical countdown to Christmas begins today.
Third Sunday of Advent
Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light the rose candle along with two purple candles.
Advent
Visit CatholicGreetings.org anytime for a selection of Catholic e-cards for holidays, saints’ feasts and other occasions!
Advent
Send an e-card to celebrate the second week of Advent.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014