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Daily Catholic Question

Do Gregorian Masses shorten the time spent in purgatory?

The custom of Gregorian Masses still exists. Even before Gregory the Great (pope from 590 to 604), some people or groups would have Mass celebrated on 30 consecutive days for a person who had died. After Gregory, it became popular in Europe to have 30 consecutive Masses said for others who had died.

While the custom has been approved by Church authorities, and confidence in it called pious and reasonable, there can be no guarantee of its efficacy. The deliverance of the departed depends on God’s mercy and pleasure.

I believe priests do not speak much of Gregorian Masses for several reasons. The custom does not pertain to the essence of faith but rather depends on private revelations. Further, it is very difficult for most priests to fulfill the requirement of celebrating Masses 30 consecutive days for the same intention.

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Monday, December 10, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/9/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/11/2012


Mary: Pius XII established this feast in 1954. But Mary’s queenship has roots in Scripture. At the Annunciation, Gabriel announced that Mary’s Son would receive the throne of David and rule forever. At the Visitation, Elizabeth calls Mary “mother of my Lord.” As in all the mysteries of Mary’s life, Mary is closely associated with Jesus: Her queenship is a share in Jesus’ kingship. We can also recall that in the Old Testament the mother of the king has great influence in court. 
<p>In the fourth century St. Ephrem (June 9)  called Mary “Lady” and “Queen.” Later Church fathers and doctors continued to use the title. Hymns of the 11th to 13th centuries address Mary as queen: “Hail, Holy Queen,” “Hail, Queen of Heaven,” “Queen of Heaven.” The Dominican rosary and the Franciscan crown as well as numerous invocations in Mary’s litany celebrate her queenship. </p><p>The feast is a logical follow-up to the Assumption and is now celebrated on the octave day of that feast. In his 1954 encyclical <i>To the Queen of Heaven</i>, Pius XII points out that Mary deserves the title because she is Mother of God, because she is closely associated as the New Eve with Jesus’ redemptive work, because of her preeminent perfection and because of her intercessory power.</p> American Catholic Blog No one listens willingly to someone who speaks to them from a position of self-righteousness and judgment. Again and again in the Gospels, Jesus reserves his harshest words for those who ignore their own weakness in order to lord it over others.

 
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