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Daily Catholic Question

Do Gregorian Masses shorten the time spent in purgatory?

The custom of Gregorian Masses still exists. Even before Gregory the Great (pope from 590 to 604), some people or groups would have Mass celebrated on 30 consecutive days for a person who had died. After Gregory, it became popular in Europe to have 30 consecutive Masses said for others who had died.

While the custom has been approved by Church authorities, and confidence in it called pious and reasonable, there can be no guarantee of its efficacy. The deliverance of the departed depends on God’s mercy and pleasure.

I believe priests do not speak much of Gregorian Masses for several reasons. The custom does not pertain to the essence of faith but rather depends on private revelations. Further, it is very difficult for most priests to fulfill the requirement of celebrating Masses 30 consecutive days for the same intention.

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Monday, December 10, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 12/9/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/11/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog Teaching by example forms a durable base from which to form character. It is the base, but alone it won’t raise the kind of person you want. Being a moral adult is fundamental to teaching children morals. But it is not sufficient, in and of itself.

Men, Women, and the Mystery of Love

 
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