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Daily Catholic Question

How did Advent come about?

Thomas J. Talley in The Origins of the Liturgical Year (Pueblo Publishing Company) sees the beginning of an advent season in the Fourth Canon of the Council of Saragosa in 380. In 567, the Synod of Tours established a December fast. And in 581 the Council of Macon ordered an advent fast for the laity from the Feast of St. Martin (November 11) to Christmas. This took the name of St. Martin's Lent.

In the seventh and eighth centuries, lectionaries (books containing the scriptural readings for the Liturgy of the Word) provided for six Sundays in Advent.

According to the Harper Collins Encyclopedia of Catholicism, edited by Richard P. McBrien, Gregory the Great, who died in 604, was the real architect of the Roman Advent. Gregory fixed the season at four weeks and composed seasonal prayers and antiphons. Gaul (France) enriched the season with eschatological elements. And the fusion of the Roman and Gallican observances returned to Rome by the 12th century.

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Saturday, December 1, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/30/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/2/2012


Presentation of Mary: Mary’s presentation was celebrated in Jerusalem in the sixth century. A church was built there in honor of this mystery. The Eastern Church was more interested in the feast, but it does appear in the West in the 11th century. Although the feast at times disappeared from the calendar, in the 16th century it became a feast of the universal Church. 
<p>As with Mary’s birth, we read of Mary’s presentation in the temple only in apocryphal literature. In what is recognized as an unhistorical account, the <i>Protoevangelium of James</i> tells us that Anna and Joachim offered Mary to God in the Temple when she was three years old. This was to carry out a promise made to God when Anna was still childless. </p><p>Though it cannot be proven historically, Mary’s presentation has an important theological purpose. It continues the impact of the feasts of the Immaculate Conception (December 8) and of the birth of Mary (September 8). It emphasizes that the holiness conferred on Mary from the beginning of her life on earth continued through her early childhood and beyond.</p> American Catholic Blog Having a saint to pray to every day for special intentions draws us into a more intimate union with Jesus, who has blessed us with so many heavenly intercessors for all our needs. It is a great privilege to have someone in heaven who cares so much about our innermost desires and personal needs.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Little Way of Advent
New! Meditations for Advent in the spirit of St. Thérèse of Lisieux.
A Catholic Family Advent
New! Celebrate Advent as a family with these prayers and activities.
Sharing the Word
New! Scriptural reflections to guide you through the season of Advent.
New book!
Get a fascinating look inside Catholic apologetics from Patrick Madrid.
Hope and Help
Guidance and inspiration for living with illness.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
World AIDS Awareness Day
An e-card from you will make someone's day. Let those who are ill know they're not forgotten.
St. Andrew
Legend says that this apostle, patron of Scotland, was crucified on an X-shaped cross.
Friendship
“Blessed are You for giving us family and friends to rejoice with us in moments of celebration.”
Praying for You
If you’ve recently been united with family around a holiday table, take a moment today to pray for those who spend holidays alone.
Sympathy
Remember also to give thanks for departed loved ones with whom you’ll someday be reunited.



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