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Daily Catholic Question

Why did Pope John Paul II ask forgiveness?

On March 12, 2000, during a very public Mass in St. Peter's Basilica, the pope celebrated a Day of Pardon, asking God's forgiveness for the sins of Catholics against seven groups of people: those persecuted in the service of the truth; Christian unity; the Jewish people; sins against "love, peace, the rights of people, and respect for cultures and religions"; the dignity of women and the unity of the human race; fundamental human rights; plus sins in general.

In his homily Pope John Paul II described "purification of memory" as an element of this Great Jubilee Year. "The Church," he said, "strong in the holiness which it has received from the Lord, kneels before God and begs forgiveness for the past and present sins of its children."

Pope John Paul II set the stage for this event in his 1994 apostolic letter On the Coming Third Millennium.

In it he wrote, "It is appropriate that, as the Second Millennium of Christianity draws to a close, the Church should become more fully conscious of the sinfulness of her children, recalling all those times in history when they departed from the spirit of Christ and his Gospel and, instead of offering to the world the witness of a life inspired by the values of faith, indulged in ways of thinking and acting which were truly forms of counter-witness and scandal" (#33).

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Friday, November 9, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/8/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/10/2012


Philip and James: 
		<b>James, Son of Alphaeus:</b> We know nothing of this man except his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James. James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater. 
<p><b>Philip:</b> Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45). </p><p>Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments, “[Jesus] said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do” (John 6:6). Philip answered, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit]” (John 6:7). </p><p>John’s story is not a put-down of Philip. It was simply necessary for these men who were to be the foundation stones of the Church to see the clear distinction between humanity’s total helplessness apart from God and the human ability to be a bearer of divine power by God’s gift. </p><p>On another occasion, we can almost hear the exasperation in Jesus’ voice. After Thomas had complained that they did not know where Jesus was going, Jesus said, “I am the way...If you know me, then you will also know my Father. From now on you do know him and have seen him” (John 14:6a, 7). Then Philip said, “Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us” (John 14:8). Enough! Jesus answered, “Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9a). </p><p>Possibly because Philip bore a Greek name or because he was thought to be close to Jesus, some Gentile proselytes came to him and asked him to introduce them to Jesus. Philip went to Andrew, and Andrew went to Jesus. Jesus’ reply in John’s Gospel is indirect; Jesus says that now his “hour” has come, that in a short time he will give his life for Jew and Gentile alike.</p> American Catholic Blog Don’t believe, sisters, that assistance consists only in giving medicines and food to the sick. There is another type of assistance that must never be forgotten, and it is the assistance of the heart that adjusts and enters in sympathy with the person who suffers and goes to meet his needs. –St. Maria Josefa of the Heart of Jesus

Walk Softly and Carry a Great Bag

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Dedication of St. John Lateran Basilica
The cathedral of the Diocese of Rome is also the Mother Church of all Roman Catholics.

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Election Day (U.S.)
As Catholics and Americans we are obligated to bring our principles and moral convictions into the political process for the common good.

Venerable Solanus Casey
This humble Capuchin friar’s sense of God’s presence inspired many who came in contact with him.




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