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Daily Catholic Question

What is the origin of the Magnificat?

The Blessed Mother's prayer, the Magnificat (which is part of the Gospel for the feast of the Visitation, May 31), is very similar to the Canticle of Hannah. The author of the Magnificat (its first words in Latin are "Magnificat anima mea," meaning, "My soul magnifies...") probably adapted the earlier text.

The Bible presents Hannah, Samuel's mother, as praying this song of praise when she brought her son to Shiloh, to thank the Lord for his birth.

The Magnificat is such a beautiful prayer that the Church uses it every day at Evening Prayer, in the Liturgy of the Hours. It perfectly summarizes Mary's faith and trust in God and is also the longest direct quote from any woman in the New Testament.

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Thursday, November 8, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/7/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/9/2012


Rita of Cascia: Like Elizabeth Ann Seton, Rita of Cascia was a wife, mother, widow and member of a religious community. Her holiness was reflected in each phase of her life. 
<p>Born at Roccaporena in central Italy, Rita wanted to become a nun but was pressured at a young age into marrying a harsh and cruel man. During her 18-year marriage, she bore and raised two sons. After her husband was killed in a brawl and her sons had died, Rita tried to join the Augustinian nuns in Cascia. Unsuccessful at first because she was a widow, Rita eventually succeeded. </p><p>Over the years, her austerity, prayerfulness and charity became legendary. When she developed wounds on her forehead, people quickly associated them with the wounds from Christ's crown of thorns. She meditated frequently on Christ's passion. Her care for the sick nuns was especially loving. She also counseled lay people who came to her monastery. </p><p>Beatified in 1626, Rita was not canonized until 1900. She has acquired the reputation, together with St. Jude, as a saint of impossible cases. Many people visit her tomb each year.</p> American Catholic Blog Your sins are great? Just tell the Lord: Forgive me, help me to get up again, change my heart! –Pope Francis

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