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Daily Catholic Question

What does "hosanna" mean?

Several biblical encyclopedias indicate that the cry of "Hosanna!" was a cry for salvation. It can be translated "Do save," "Save, we ask" or "Lord, grant salvation!"

That is its sense as it appears in Psalm 118:2. On the Feast of Tents the Jewish people made a procession with palms while singing hosanna. The seventh day was called the Great Hosanna. Used by crowds in the Gospels as Jesus enters Jerusalem (Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:9 ; and John 12:13), it is a cry of praise, homage, supplication, and joy used to recognize Jesus’ royal messianic dignity.

The cry of hosanna passed from use in the liturgy of the synagogues to our use in the Christian liturgy where it continues to be a shout of praise and honor.

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/6/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/8/2012


Matthew: Matthew was a Jew who worked for the occupying Roman forces, collecting taxes from other Jews. The Romans were not scrupulous about what the "tax farmers" got for themselves. Hence the latter, known as "publicans," were generally hated as traitors by their fellow Jews. The Pharisees lumped them with "sinners" (see Matthew 9:11-13). So it was shocking to them to hear Jesus call such a man to be one of his intimate followers. 
<p>Matthew got Jesus in further trouble by having a sort of going-away party at his house. The Gospel tells us that "many" tax collectors and "those known as sinners" came to the dinner. The Pharisees were still more badly shocked. What business did the supposedly great teacher have associating with such immoral people? Jesus' answer was, "Those who are well do not need a physician, but the sick do. Go and learn the meaning of the words, 'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' I did not come to call the righteous but sinners" (Matthew 9:12b-13). Jesus is not setting aside ritual and worship; he is saying that loving others is even more important. </p><p>No other particular incidents about Matthew are found in the New Testament.</p> American Catholic Blog The most appealing invitation to embrace the religious life is the witness of our own lives, the spirit in which we react to our divine calling, the completeness of our dedication, the generosity and cheerfulness of our service to God, the love we have for one another, the apostolic zeal with which we witness to Christ’s love for the poorest of the poor.

 
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