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Daily Catholic Question

What does "hosanna" mean?

Several biblical encyclopedias indicate that the cry of "Hosanna!" was a cry for salvation. It can be translated "Do save," "Save, we ask" or "Lord, grant salvation!"

That is its sense as it appears in Psalm 118:2. On the Feast of Tents the Jewish people made a procession with palms while singing hosanna. The seventh day was called the Great Hosanna. Used by crowds in the Gospels as Jesus enters Jerusalem (Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:9 ; and John 12:13), it is a cry of praise, homage, supplication, and joy used to recognize Jesus’ royal messianic dignity.

The cry of hosanna passed from use in the liturgy of the synagogues to our use in the Christian liturgy where it continues to be a shout of praise and honor.

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Wednesday, November 07, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/6/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/8/2012

Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
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