AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

What does "hosanna" mean?

Several biblical encyclopedias indicate that the cry of "Hosanna!" was a cry for salvation. It can be translated "Do save," "Save, we ask" or "Lord, grant salvation!"

That is its sense as it appears in Psalm 118:2. On the Feast of Tents the Jewish people made a procession with palms while singing hosanna. The seventh day was called the Great Hosanna. Used by crowds in the Gospels as Jesus enters Jerusalem (Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:9 ; and John 12:13), it is a cry of praise, homage, supplication, and joy used to recognize Jesus’ royal messianic dignity.

The cry of hosanna passed from use in the liturgy of the synagogues to our use in the Christian liturgy where it continues to be a shout of praise and honor.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/6/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/8/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Little Way of Advent
New! Meditations for Advent in the spirit of St. Thérèse of Lisieux.
A Catholic Family Advent
New! Celebrate Advent as a family with these prayers and activities.
Sharing the Word
New! Scriptural reflections to guide you through the season of Advent.
New book!
Get a fascinating look inside Catholic apologetics from Patrick Madrid.
Hope and Help
Guidance and inspiration for living with illness.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Sacrament of Reconciliation
Make time this month to be reconciled to God, Church, family and friends. Express your peacefulness with our e-cards.
Election Day (U.S.)
As Catholics and Americans we are obligated to bring our principles and moral convictions into the political process for the common good.
Venerable Solanus Casey
This humble Capuchin friar’s sense of God’s presence inspired many who came in contact with him.
Communion of Saints
As we celebrate this tenet of our faith remind yourself and others that we’re all called to sainthood.
St. Martin de Porres
Though born in Peru, this 16th-century Dominican brother is a popular patron for many African American Catholics.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic