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Daily Catholic Question

Isn't confession enough for a bishop who has sinned?

God often uses weak and flawed human beings as his instruments of grace. We should be ready to accept the repentance of any and all sinners who ask the forgiveness of
God, his people and all who have been hurt by their sins.

But it is also true, and our experience shows us, that some addictions and emotional or mental ills are not easily healed or overcome. To move priests, monsignors or bishops from one post to another without addressing their basic problem does them no good and only creates more harm.

We owe help to our ministers who have problems of addiction or who struggle with emotional problems. But we must also help their victims and protect the innocent. We can't just perpetuate the conditions and situations that produced past harms.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, November 6, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/5/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/7/2012


Visitation: This is a fairly late feast, going back only to the 13th or 14th century. It was established widely throughout the Church to pray for unity. The present date of celebration was set in 1969 in order to follow the Annunciation of the Lord (March 25) and precede the Nativity of John the Baptist (June 24). 
<p>Like most feasts of Mary, it is closely connected with Jesus and his saving work. The more visible actors in the visitation drama (see Luke 1:39-45) are Mary and Elizabeth. However, Jesus and John the Baptist steal the scene in a hidden way. Jesus makes John leap with joy—the joy of messianic salvation. Elizabeth, in turn, is filled with the Holy Spirit and addresses words of praise to Mary—words that echo down through the ages. </p><p>It is helpful to recall that we do not have a journalist’s account of this meeting. Rather, Luke, speaking for the Church, gives a prayerful poet’s rendition of the scene. Elizabeth’s praise of Mary as “the mother of my Lord” can be viewed as the earliest Church’s devotion to Mary. As with all authentic devotion to Mary, Elizabeth’s (the Church’s) words first praise God for what God has done to Mary. Only secondly does she praise Mary for trusting God’s words. </p><p>Then comes the Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55). Here Mary herself (like the Church) traces all her greatness to God.</p> American Catholic Blog Someone once told Pope Francis that his words had inspired him to give a lot more to the poor. Pope Francis’s response was to challenge the man not to just give money, but to roll up his sleeves, get his hands dirty, and actually reach out and help.

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