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Daily Catholic Question

Must Catholics vote for the pro-life candidate?

Catholic moral teaching says that Catholic voters should consider a wide range of issues when deciding for whom they will vote.

The administrative board of the U.S. Catholic bishops in 1999 issued Faithful Citizenship, a statement on political responsibility. Speaking for and to Catholics in this country, the bishops wrote: “Our moral framework does not easily fit the categories of right or left, Democrat or Republican. Our responsibility is to measure every party and platform by how its agenda touches human life and dignity.”

They also wrote, “We believe that every human life is sacred from conception to natural death; that people are more important than things; and that the measure of every institution is whether or not it enhances the life and dignity of the human person.”

The USCCB updates Faithful Citizenship periodically. Check out their website at www.usccb.org for the latest edition.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Sunday, November 4, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/3/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/5/2012


Francesco Antonio Fasani: Born in Lucera (southeast Italy), Francesco entered the Conventual Franciscans in 1695. After his ordination 10 years later, he taught philosophy to younger friars, served as guardian of his friary and later became provincial. When his term of office ended, Francesco became master of novices and finally pastor in his hometown. 
<p>In his various ministries, he was loving, devout and penitential. He was a sought-after confessor and preacher. One witness at the canonical hearings regarding Francesco’s holiness testified, "In his preaching he spoke in a familiar way, filled as he was with the love of God and neighbor; fired by the Spirit, he made use of the words and deed of Holy Scripture, stirring his listeners and moving them to do penance." Francesco showed himself a loyal friend of the poor, never hesitating to seek from benefactors what was needed. </p><p>At his death in Lucera, children ran through the streets and cried out, "The saint is dead! The saint is dead!" Francesco was canonized in 1986.</p> American Catholic Blog As people of faith, we wake up with a purpose. We have a sense of mission, and this gives our lives enduring meaning. We can share with confidence the Word of God, no matter what circumstances we find ourselves in. There are no chance encounters!

 
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