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Daily Catholic Question

What's the "40-day fast" of St. Francis?

Both Thomas of Celano and St. Bonaventure mention St. Francis’ fast from the Feast of the Assumption (August 15) to the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel (September 29). They speak of it as a fast of 40 days.

If you count off the days on the calendar, that is a period of more than 40 days&mdashno matter on what day you begin or end the count.

All I can surmise is that the authors (and St. Francis himself) meant the expression “a fast of 40 days” to be taken in the moral sense of about 40 days. The feasts were more important as the starting and ending times than the exact number of days. And I cannot personally believe Francis would have advocated fasting on the feasts themselves.

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Friday, November 30, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/29/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 12/1/2012


Peter Chanel: Anyone who has worked in loneliness, with great adaptation required and with little apparent success, will find a kindred spirit in Peter Chanel. 
<p>As a young priest he revived a parish in a "bad" district by the simple method of showing great devotion to the sick. Wanting to be a missionary, he joined the Society of Mary (Marists) at 28. Obediently, he taught in the seminary for five years. Then, as superior of seven Marists, he traveled to Western Oceania where he was entrusted with an apostolic vicariate (term for a region that may later become a diocese). The bishop accompanying the missionaries left Peter and a brother on Futuna Island in the New Hebrides, promising to return in six months. He was gone five years. </p><p>Meanwhile, Pedro struggled with this new language and mastered it, making the difficult adjustment to life with whalers, traders and warring natives. Despite little apparent success and severe want, he maintained a serene and gentle spirit and endless patience and courage. A few natives had been baptized, a few more were being instructed. When the chieftain's son asked to be baptized, persecution by the chieftain reached a climax. Father Chanel was clubbed to death, his body cut to pieces. </p><p>Within two years after his death, the whole island became Catholic and has remained so. Peter Chanel is the first martyr of Oceania and its patron.</p> American Catholic Blog Here is an often overlooked piece of advice: When trying to determine what God wants us to do, we should seek Him out and remain close to Him. Makes perfect sense doesn't it? If we are concerned about following the Lord's will, having a close relationship with Him makes the process much simpler.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Andrew
Legend says that this apostle, patron of Scotland, was crucified on an X-shaped cross.

Friendship
“Blessed are You for giving us family and friends to rejoice with us in moments of celebration.”

Praying for You
If you’ve recently been united with family around a holiday table, take a moment today to pray for those who spend holidays alone.

Sympathy
Remember also to give thanks for departed loved ones with whom you’ll someday be reunited.

Happy Birthday
God of life, we come to celebrate another year and ask you to bless us.




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