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Daily Catholic Question

Was Job a real person?

Asking if Job was a real, historical person is something like asking if there really was a boy who cried wolf once too often. It is like wanting to know how old the Good Samaritan was when he came upon the wounded Jew. These questions miss the point.

The important thing about the book of Job is the message it conveys: Have faith and trust in the midst of trouble. With that said, R. Potter, O.P., in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture, writes: "It is reasonable to hold and there is ample evidence that Job was the name of an ancient patriarch, sage or hero in Israel and in yet older traditions of Mesopotamia and Egypt."

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Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/27/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/29/2012

Denis and Companions: This martyr and patron of France is regarded as the first bishop of Paris. His popularity is due to a series of legends, especially those connecting him with the great abbey church of St. Denis in Paris. He was for a time confused with the writer now called Pseudo-Dionysius. 
<p>The best hypothesis contends that Denis was sent to Gaul from Rome in the third century and beheaded in the persecution under Emperor Valerius in 258. </p><p>According to one of the legends, after he was martyred on Montmartre (literally, "mountain of martyrs") in Paris, he carried his head to a village northeast of the city. St. Genevieve built a basilica over his tomb at the beginning of the sixth century.</p> American Catholic Blog The saints share in God’s glory, for they are God’s new creation through Jesus Christ. This new creation radiates God’s glory, for God fills the saints with his grace. He shares his glory, his divine life, with those who are willing to receive it through the work and person of Jesus Christ.

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If you’ve recently been united with family around a holiday table, take a moment today to pray for those who spend holidays alone.

Remember also to give thanks for departed loved ones with whom you’ll someday be reunited.

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God of life, we come to celebrate another year and ask you to bless us.

Solemnity of Our Lord, Christ the King
Our liturgical year ends as it begins, focusing on Our Lord’s eternal reign.

Solemnity of Our Lord, Christ the King
Our liturgical year ends as it begins, focusing on Our Lord’s eternal reign.

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