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Daily Catholic Question

Why are divorced/remarried Catholics treated differently from other sinners?

In the case of a convicted murderer, the action or the sin committed is over and done with. It can be repented with the intention of never committing that sin again. He or she can be reconciled to God and receive holy Communion.

If someone has been validly married, obtained a civil divorce and then remarried outside the Church, that person has chosen to act contrary to the command of Christ and the Church. As long as this situation persists, repentance and reconciliation are impossible because the Church has no power to dispense people from the marital obligations of fidelity, unity, and permanence.

If you are divorced and remarried, there is always the possibility that your first marriage was invalid and a way can be found for reconciliation and a return to the sacraments. Contact a priest.

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Wednesday, November 21, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/20/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/22/2012


Th&eacute;r&egrave;se of Lisieux: "I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Thérèse of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. (In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.) And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, <i>The Story of a Soul</i>, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. She was canonized in 1925, and two years later she and St. Francis Xavier were declared co-patrons of the missions. 
<p>Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth." </p><p>On October 19, 1997, Saint John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized, in light of her holiness and the influence on the Church of her teaching on spirituality. Her parents, Louis and Zélie were beatified in 2008.</p> American Catholic Blog How glorious, how holy and wonderful it is to have a Father in Heaven.

 
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