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Daily Catholic Question

Who appoints bishops?

Canon 377 states it clearly: "The Supreme Pontiff freely appoints bishops or confirms those lawfully elected."

The Code of Canon Law (Canon 377, 2) legislates that at least every three years the bishops of an ecclesiastical province or a bishops' conference are to draw up a list of priests suitable for the episcopate and send the list to Rome. And each bishop individually has the right to make known worthy candidates.

Also, according to the Code, in the case of appointing diocesan bishops the papal legate, after consultation with different people, suggests candidates (Canon 377, 3). Canon 377 further specifies that, in the case of an auxiliary bishop, the diocesan bishop proposes a list of at least three candidates.

To sort through these lists and assist the pope in his decisionmaking, there is the Vatican Congregation for Bishops. But in the end, it is the pope who decides the appointment of bishops and the terms of their appointments.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, November 15, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/14/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/16/2012


Bartholomew: In the New Testament, Bartholomew is mentioned only in the lists of the apostles. Some scholars identify him with Nathanael, a man of Cana in Galilee who was summoned to Jesus by Philip. Jesus paid him a great compliment: “Here is a true Israelite. There is no duplicity in him” (John 1:47b). When Nathanael asked how Jesus knew him, Jesus said, “I saw you under the fig tree” (John 1:48b). Whatever amazing revelation this involved, it brought Nathanael to exclaim, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel” (John 1:49b). But Jesus countered with, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this” (John 1:50b). 
<p>Nathanael did see greater things. He was one of those to whom Jesus appeared on the shore of the Sea of Tiberias after his resurrection (see John 21:1-14). They had been fishing all night without success. In the morning, they saw someone standing on the shore though no one knew it was Jesus. He told them to cast their net again, and they made so great a catch that they could not haul the net in. Then John cried out to Peter, “It is the Lord.” </p><p>When they brought the boat to shore, they found a fire burning, with some fish laid on it and some bread. Jesus asked them to bring some of the fish they had caught, and invited them to come and eat their meal. John relates that although they knew it was Jesus, none of the apostles presumed to inquire who he was. This, John notes, was the third time Jesus appeared to the apostles.</p> American Catholic Blog While you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even more fully in your heart.<br /> –St. Francis of Assisi

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