AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Should we address Mary as “you” or “thee”?

There really is no theological point involved. There is not an official translation anywhere. There is no text in the Enchiridion of Indulgences. Some prayer books use you and your while others use thee, thy, and thou. It is a matter of personal preference and generational differences, what sounds best to a person’s ear and what he or she memorized as a child.

When it comes to the Lord’s Prayer, the Sacramentary uses thy in the first part of the prayer. Our bishops thought that was the way people learned the prayer and they would be most familiar and comfortable with it. Yet in the priest’s part and in the doxology following the prayer, the Sacramentary uses you and your to address the Father.

The biggest reason for using one over the other (thee or you) is for unity in public and common prayer.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/13/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/15/2012


Athanasius: Athanasius led a tumultuous but dedicated life of service to the Church. He was the great champion of the faith against the widespread heresy of Arianism, the teaching by Arius that Jesus was not truly divine. The vigor of his writings earned him the title of doctor of the Church. 
<p>Born of a Christian family in Alexandria, Egypt, and given a classical education, Athanasius became secretary to Alexander, the bishop of Alexandria, entered the priesthood and was eventually named bishop himself. His predecessor, Alexander, had been an outspoken critic of a new movement growing in the East—Arianism. </p><p>When Athanasius assumed his role as bishop of Alexandria, he continued the fight against Arianism. At first it seemed that the battle would be easily won and that Arianism would be condemned. Such, however, did not prove to be the case. The Council of Tyre was called and for several reasons that are still unclear, the Emperor Constantine exiled Athanasius to northern Gaul. This was to be the first in a series of travels and exiles reminiscent of the life of St. Paul. </p><p>After Constantine died, his son restored Athanasius as bishop. This lasted only a year, however, for he was deposed once again by a coalition of Arian bishops. Athanasius took his case to Rome, and Pope Julius I called a synod to review the case and other related matters. </p><p>Five times Athanasius was exiled for his defense of the doctrine of Christ’s divinity. During one period of his life, he enjoyed 10 years of relative peace—reading, writing and promoting the Christian life along the lines of the monastic ideal to which he was greatly devoted. His dogmatic and historical writings are almost all polemic, directed against every aspect of Arianism. </p><p>Among his ascetical writings, his<i> Life of St. Anthony</i> (January 17) achieved astonishing popularity and contributed greatly to the establishment of monastic life throughout the Western Christian world.</p> American Catholic Blog Suffering is redemptive in part because it definitively reveals to man that he is not in fact God, and it thereby opens the human person to receive the divine.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Thanksgiving
Prepare for next week’s celebration of gratitude by scheduling Catholic Greetings e-cards for family and friends.

New Baby
Holy God, we are grateful that you choose to allow us to share in the making of life.

Happy Birthday
We pray that God’s gifts will lead you to grow in wisdom and strength throughout the coming year.

Remembering the Faithful Departed
An e-card can be a gentle reminder to pray for loved ones who have died. 

Veterans' Day (U.S.)
May the blessings of peace enfold our past and present military personnel today and every day.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016