Skip Navigation Links
Catholic News
Special Reports
Google Plus
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

How can one catch up on changes after returning to the Church?

The first place to check is your own parish. Your pastor or someone on the hospitality committee will be very eager to help you settle in and feel at home.

Also, there are many books, videos, and newsletters at that might help you understand the changes in the Mass and any other parts of the faith you find confusing.

Welcome home!

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/12/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/14/2012

Andrew Dung-Lac and Companions: Andrew Dung-Lac was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of this group were beatified on four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized by St. John Paul II. 
<p>Christianity came to Vietnam (then three separate kingdoms) through the Portuguese. Jesuits opened the first permanent mission at Da Nang in 1615. They ministered to Japanese Catholics who had been driven from Japan. </p><p>The king of one of the kingdoms banned all foreign missionaries and tried to make all Vietnamese deny their faith by trampling on a crucifix. Like the priest-holes in Ireland during English persecution, many hiding places were offered in homes of the faithful. </p><p>Severe persecutions were again launched three times in the 19th century. During the six decades after 1820, between 100,000 and 300,000 Catholics were killed or subjected to great hardship. Foreign missionaries martyred in the first wave included priests of the Paris Mission Society, and Spanish Dominican priests and tertiaries. </p><p>Persecution broke out again in 1847 when the emperor suspected foreign missionaries and Vietnamese Christians of sympathizing with a rebellion led by of one of his sons. </p><p>The last of the martyrs were 17 laypersons, one of them a 9-year-old, executed in 1862. That year a treaty with France guaranteed religious freedom to Catholics, but it did not stop all persecution. </p><p>By 1954 there were over a million and a half Catholics—about seven percent of the population—in the north. Buddhists represented about 60 percent. Persistent persecution forced some 670,000 Catholics to abandon lands, homes and possessions and flee to the south. In 1964, there were still 833,000 Catholics in the north, but many were in prison. In the south, Catholics were enjoying the first decade of religious freedom in centuries, their numbers swelled by refugees. </p><p>During the Vietnamese war, Catholics again suffered in the north, and again moved to the south in great numbers. Now the whole country is under Communist rule.</p> American Catholic Blog I discovered that my sins had created a spiritual racket that drowned out the gentle whispers of God to my soul; God had never actually abandoned me, but I needed repentance and sacramental grace to reawaken all that was good and beautiful in me.

Life's Great Questions

New Baby
Holy God, we are grateful that you choose to allow us to share in the making of life.

Happy Birthday
We pray that God’s gifts will lead you to grow in wisdom and strength throughout the coming year.

Remembering the Faithful Departed
An e-card can be a gentle reminder to pray for loved ones who have died. 

Veterans' Day (U.S.)
May the blessings of peace enfold our past and present military personnel today and every day.

Dedication of St. John Lateran Basilica
The cathedral of the Diocese of Rome is also the Mother Church of all Roman Catholics.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic

An Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015