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Daily Catholic Question

How should we prepare for Communion in the home?

Start with the most important thing: creating an atmosphere conducive to prayer and reverence. Sometime before you expect the priest or eucharistic minister to come, turn off the TV and radio. Give the sick person time to pray and prepare for reception of Communion.

Those who care for the sick may want to pray with them. The caregivers are allowed to receive Communion with the sick under the usual norms for Communion.

When Communion is to be brought to the home, the ritual Pastoral Care of the Sick directs that those with the sick prepare a table covered with a linen cloth as the place where the minister will put the Eucharist until the time of Communion itself. There should be lighted candles on the table and, where customary, a vessel of holy water. I would add that it is wise also to put a spoon and glass of drinking water on the table, in case the sick person has difficulty swallowing the host.

If the sick person is well enough to assist, he or she is encouraged to join with the caregivers in choosing some of the prayers and readings for the Liturgy of the Word.

It is appropriate for one of the caregivers to meet the minister at the door of the home and lead the minister to the sickroom.

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Monday, November 12, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/11/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/13/2012


Sharbel Makhluf: Although this saint never traveled far from the Lebanese village of Beka-Kafra, where he was born, his influence has spread widely. 
<p>Joseph Zaroun Makluf was raised by an uncle because his father, a mule driver, died when Joseph was only three. At the age of 23, Joseph joined the Monastery of St. Maron at Annaya, Lebanon, and took the name Sharbel in honor of a second-century martyr. He professed his final vows in 1853 and was ordained six years later. </p><p>Following the example of the fifth-century St. Maron, Sharbel lived as a hermit from 1875 until his death. His reputation for holiness prompted people to seek him to receive a blessing and to be remembered in his prayers. He followed a strict fast and was very devoted to the Blessed Sacrament. When his superiors occasionally asked him to administer the sacraments to nearby villages, Sharbel did so gladly. </p><p>He died in the late afternoon on Christmas Eve. Christians and non-Christians soon made his tomb a place of pilgrimage and of cures. Pope Paul VI beatified him in 1965 and canonized him 12 years later.</p> American Catholic Blog You cannot claim to be ‘for Christ’ and espouse a political cause that implies callous indifference to the needs of millions of human beings and even cooperate in their destruction.

 
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