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Daily Catholic Question

How should we prepare for Communion in the home?

Start with the most important thing: creating an atmosphere conducive to prayer and reverence. Sometime before you expect the priest or eucharistic minister to come, turn off the TV and radio. Give the sick person time to pray and prepare for reception of Communion.

Those who care for the sick may want to pray with them. The caregivers are allowed to receive Communion with the sick under the usual norms for Communion.

When Communion is to be brought to the home, the ritual Pastoral Care of the Sick directs that those with the sick prepare a table covered with a linen cloth as the place where the minister will put the Eucharist until the time of Communion itself. There should be lighted candles on the table and, where customary, a vessel of holy water. I would add that it is wise also to put a spoon and glass of drinking water on the table, in case the sick person has difficulty swallowing the host.

If the sick person is well enough to assist, he or she is encouraged to join with the caregivers in choosing some of the prayers and readings for the Liturgy of the Word.

It is appropriate for one of the caregivers to meet the minister at the door of the home and lead the minister to the sickroom.

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Monday, November 12, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 11/11/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 11/13/2012


Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog A hero isn’t someone born with unconquerable strength and selflessness. Heroes are not formed in a cataclysmic instant. Heroism is developed over time, one decision after another, moment by moment, formed by a deliberate, chosen, and habitual response to life.

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