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Daily Catholic Question

What is the meaning of initials behind the names of some Franciscans?

I have noticed that some Franciscan priests have T.O.R. after their family name. What does that mean?

It means Third Order Regular. St. Francis of Assisi founded the Order of Friars Minor, helped St. Clare establish the Poor Clares (Second Order) and then set up the Third Order, open to men and women, married or single.

Eventually, the Third Order became two different groups: Secular Franciscan Order (men and women as described above) and the Third Order Regular movement (men’s or women’s religious communities, professing the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience).

The Third Order Regular movement represented a new form of religious life, allowing women especially to engage in these “active” apostolates. There are approximately 12,000 Franciscan sisters within 83 U.S. congregations.

These sisters often use O.S.F. (Order of St. Francis) to avoid confusion with the international men’s group.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/8/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/10/2012


All Saints: The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (<i>On the Calculation of Time</i>). 
<p>But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. </p><p>How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.</p> American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand.

 
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