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Daily Catholic Question

What is the meaning of initials behind the names of some Franciscans?

I have noticed that some Franciscan priests have T.O.R. after their family name. What does that mean?

It means Third Order Regular. St. Francis of Assisi founded the Order of Friars Minor, helped St. Clare establish the Poor Clares (Second Order) and then set up the Third Order, open to men and women, married or single.

Eventually, the Third Order became two different groups: Secular Franciscan Order (men and women as described above) and the Third Order Regular movement (men’s or women’s religious communities, professing the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience).

The Third Order Regular movement represented a new form of religious life, allowing women especially to engage in these “active” apostolates. There are approximately 12,000 Franciscan sisters within 83 U.S. congregations.

These sisters often use O.S.F. (Order of St. Francis) to avoid confusion with the international men’s group.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/8/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/10/2012


Columban: Columban was the greatest of the Irish missionaries who worked on the European continent. As a young man who was greatly tormented by temptations of the flesh, he sought the advice of a religious woman who had lived a hermit’s life for years. He saw in her answer a call to leave the world. He went first to a monk on an island in Lough Erne, then to the great monastic seat of learning at Bangor. 
<p>After many years of seclusion and prayer, he traveled to Gaul (modern-day France) with 12 companion missionaries. They won wide respect for the rigor of their discipline, their preaching, and their commitment to charity and religious life in a time characterized by clerical laxity and civil strife. Columban established several monasteries in Europe which became centers of religion and culture. </p><p>Like all saints, he met opposition. Ultimately he had to appeal to the pope against complaints of Frankish bishops, for vindication of his orthodoxy and approval of Irish customs. He reproved the king for his licentious life, insisting that he marry. Since this threatened the power of the queen mother, Columban was deported to Ireland. His ship ran aground in a storm, and he continued his work in Europe, ultimately arriving in Italy, where he found favor with the king of the Lombards. In his last years he established the famous monastery of Bobbio, where he died. His writings include a treatise on penance and against Arianism, sermons, poetry and his monastic rule.</p> American Catholic Blog There are not a hundred people in America who hate the Catholic Church. There are millions of people who hate what they wrongly believe to be the Catholic Church—which is, of course, quite a different thing. –Bishop Fulton Sheen

 
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