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Daily Catholic Question

How are the Sunday readings selected?

Our three-year cycle of Sunday readings uses Matthew in Year A, Mark in Year B and Luke in Year C. The First Sunday of Advent, December 3, 2000, begins Year C. The Gospel of John is used each year during the Easter season and during Year B since the Gospel of Mark is shorter than the others.

The Gospel readings are chosen first; Sunday’s first reading is coordinated with it. The second reading is continuous from the previous Sunday, almost always on a different theme.

Weekday Masses have a single cycle of Gospel readings. All four Gospels are used at weekday Masses each year. The first reading on weekdays is either Year I (odd-numbered years) or Year II (even-numbered years). Weekday readings for Advent and Lent are the same each year.

Although the Lectionary (book of readings) is the same for Roman Catholics worldwide, small differences from country to country exist. For example, Italian Catholics celebrate Epiphany on January 6 while U.S. Catholics celebrate this feast on the first Sunday after January 1.

A reading can omit a few verses. This usually provides greater clarity but can raise problems about context.

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Monday, October 8, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/7/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/9/2012


Our Lady of Lourdes: On December 8, 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception in the apostolic constitution <i>Ineffabilis Deus</i>. A little more than three years later, on February 11, 1858, a young lady appeared to Bernadette Soubirous. This began a series of visions. During the apparition on March 25, the lady identified herself with the words: “I am the Immaculate Conception.” 
<p>Bernadette was a sickly child of poor parents. Their practice of the Catholic faith was scarcely more than lukewarm. Bernadette could pray the Our Father, the Hail Mary and the Creed. She also knew the prayer of the Miraculous Medal: “O Mary conceived without sin.” </p><p>During interrogations Bernadette gave an account of what she saw. It was “something white in the shape of a girl.” She used the word <i>aquero</i>, a dialect term meaning “this thing.” It was “a pretty young girl with a rosary over her arm.” Her white robe was encircled by a blue girdle. She wore a white veil. There was a yellow rose on each foot. A rosary was in her hand. Bernadette was also impressed by the fact that the lady did not use the informal form of address (<i>tu</i>), but the polite form (<i>vous</i>). The humble virgin appeared to a humble girl and treated her with dignity. </p><p>Through that humble girl, Mary revitalized and continues to revitalize the faith of millions of people. People began to flock to Lourdes from other parts of France and from all over the world. In 1862 Church authorities confirmed the authenticity of the apparitions and authorized the cult of Our Lady of Lourdes for the diocese. The Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes became worldwide in 1907.</p> American Catholic Blog While the term social justice has received negative connotations in some circles in recent years due to certain media misrepresentations of the tradition, the vocation of all Christian women and men to work toward the common good, protect the dignity of all human life, strive toward ending violence in all forms, and providing for the welfare of all people remains integral to who we are as bearers of the name Christ.

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