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Daily Catholic Question

How are the Sunday readings selected?

Our three-year cycle of Sunday readings uses Matthew in Year A, Mark in Year B and Luke in Year C. The First Sunday of Advent, December 3, 2000, begins Year C. The Gospel of John is used each year during the Easter season and during Year B since the Gospel of Mark is shorter than the others.

The Gospel readings are chosen first; Sunday’s first reading is coordinated with it. The second reading is continuous from the previous Sunday, almost always on a different theme.

Weekday Masses have a single cycle of Gospel readings. All four Gospels are used at weekday Masses each year. The first reading on weekdays is either Year I (odd-numbered years) or Year II (even-numbered years). Weekday readings for Advent and Lent are the same each year.

Although the Lectionary (book of readings) is the same for Roman Catholics worldwide, small differences from country to country exist. For example, Italian Catholics celebrate Epiphany on January 6 while U.S. Catholics celebrate this feast on the first Sunday after January 1.

A reading can omit a few verses. This usually provides greater clarity but can raise problems about context.

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Monday, October 8, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/7/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/9/2012


Dominic of Silos: It’s not the founder of the Dominicans we honor today, but there’s a poignant story that connects both Dominics. 
<p>Our saint today, Dominic of Silos, was born in Spain around the year 1000 into a peasant family. As a young boy he spent time in the fields, where he welcomed the solitude. He became a Benedictine priest and served in numerous leadership positions. Following a dispute with the king over property, Dominic and two other monks were exiled. They established a new monastery in what at first seemed an unpromising location. Under Dominic’s leadership, however, it became one of the most famous houses in Spain. Many healings were reported there. </p><p>About 100 years after Dominic’s death, a young woman made a pilgrimage to his tomb. There Dominic of Silos appeared to her and assured her that she would bear another son. The woman was Joan of Aza, and the son she bore grew up to be the "other" Dominic—the one who founded the Dominicans. </p><p>For many years thereafter, the staff used by St. Dominic of Silos was brought to the royal palace whenever a queen of Spain was in labor. That practice ended in 1931.</p> American Catholic Blog In a short time we will celebrate the fact that God has come to us so that we can be with him now and forever. The birth of the Son fulfills God’s longing to speak to us as one friend speaks to another.

 
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