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Daily Catholic Question

How are the Sunday readings selected?

Our three-year cycle of Sunday readings uses Matthew in Year A, Mark in Year B and Luke in Year C. The First Sunday of Advent, December 3, 2000, begins Year C. The Gospel of John is used each year during the Easter season and during Year B since the Gospel of Mark is shorter than the others.

The Gospel readings are chosen first; Sunday’s first reading is coordinated with it. The second reading is continuous from the previous Sunday, almost always on a different theme.

Weekday Masses have a single cycle of Gospel readings. All four Gospels are used at weekday Masses each year. The first reading on weekdays is either Year I (odd-numbered years) or Year II (even-numbered years). Weekday readings for Advent and Lent are the same each year.

Although the Lectionary (book of readings) is the same for Roman Catholics worldwide, small differences from country to country exist. For example, Italian Catholics celebrate Epiphany on January 6 while U.S. Catholics celebrate this feast on the first Sunday after January 1.

A reading can omit a few verses. This usually provides greater clarity but can raise problems about context.

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Monday, October 8, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/7/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/9/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog Teaching by example forms a durable base from which to form character. It is the base, but alone it won’t raise the kind of person you want. Being a moral adult is fundamental to teaching children morals. But it is not sufficient, in and of itself.

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