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Daily Catholic Question

How can bishops change the date of holy days?

How can the U.S. bishops say that we have no duty to attend Mass on a holy day of obligation if it falls on a Monday or a Saturday?

The 1983 Code of Canon Law for the Latin rite specifies 10 holy days of obligation: January 1, Epiphany, St. Joseph, Ascension, Corpus Christi, Sts. Peter and Paul, Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception and Christmas.

That same Code allows episcopal conferences, with prior approval of the Holy See, to suppress certain holy days of obligation or transfer them to a Sunday (Canon #1246:2).

The precepts of the Church are interpreted by the Church's legitimate authority—in this case, by the Holy See and the bishops' conferences.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Saturday, October 26, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 10/25/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 10/27/2013


Augustine of Hippo: A Christian at 33, a priest at 36, a bishop at 41: Many people are familiar with the biographical sketch of Augustine of Hippo, sinner turned saint. But really to get to know the man is a rewarding experience. 
<p>There quickly surfaces the intensity with which he lived his life, whether his path led away from or toward God. The tears of his mother (August 27), the instructions of Ambrose (December 7) and, most of all, God himself speaking to him in the Scriptures redirected Augustine’s love of life to a life of love. </p><p>Having been so deeply immersed in creature-pride of life in his early days and having drunk deeply of its bitter dregs, it is not surprising that Augustine should have turned, with a holy fierceness, against the many demon-thrusts rampant in his day. His times were truly decadent—politically, socially, morally. He was both feared and loved, like the Master. The perennial criticism leveled against him: a fundamental rigorism. </p><p>In his day, he providentially fulfilled the office of prophet. Like Jeremiah and other greats, he was hard-pressed but could not keep quiet. “I say to myself, I will not mention him,/I will speak in his name no more./But then it becomes like fire burning in my heart,/imprisoned in my bones;/I grow weary holding it in,/I cannot endure it” (Jeremiah 20:9).</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, please fill my heart and soul with the confidence that you will always provide what I need, when I need it, and let me be obedient to you.

Spiritual Resilience

 
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