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Daily Catholic Question

How can bishops change the date of holy days?

How can the U.S. bishops say that we have no duty to attend Mass on a holy day of obligation if it falls on a Monday or a Saturday?

The 1983 Code of Canon Law for the Latin rite specifies 10 holy days of obligation: January 1, Epiphany, St. Joseph, Ascension, Corpus Christi, Sts. Peter and Paul, Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception and Christmas.

That same Code allows episcopal conferences, with prior approval of the Holy See, to suppress certain holy days of obligation or transfer them to a Sunday (Canon #1246:2).

The precepts of the Church are interpreted by the Church's legitimate authority—in this case, by the Holy See and the bishops' conferences.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Friday, October 26, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/25/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/27/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
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