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Daily Catholic Question

Where is God in suffering?

Yes, there is a great deal of suffering in this world. Isn't most of it, however, caused by an abuse of human freedom? Every day newspapers carry stories about human freedom used destructively.

God could prevent such tragedies by temporarily and selectively suspending human freedom to prevent its abuse. That would suggest that people never have to accept the consequences of their destructive decisions yet are free to claim responsibility for decisions with positive outcomes.

If God totally abolished human freedom, that would eliminate the positive uses of such freedom. Doesn't love require human freedom? Isn't our freedom part of being made in God's image and likeness? (See Genesis 1:27.)

Because I believe in a life beyond this one and because I believe that God is both good and just, then the abuse of human freedom cannot have the last word. God's values must prevail eventually.

Although I cannot control how other people use their freedom, I can and must decide how I will use mine. No one can do everything, but everyone can do something.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/15/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/17/2012

John Leonardi: "I am only one person! Why should I do anything? What good would it do?" Today, as in any age, people seem plagued with the dilemma of getting involved. In his own way John Leonardi answered these questions. He chose to become a priest. 
<p>After his ordination, he became very active in the works of the ministry, especially in hospitals and prisons. The example and dedication of his work attracted several young laymen who began to assist him. They later became priests themselves. </p><p>John lived after the Protestant Reformation and the Council of Trent (1545-63). He and his followers projected a new congregation of diocesan priests. For some reason the plan, which was ultimately approved, provoked great political opposition. John was exiled from his home town of Lucca, Italy, for almost the entire remainder of his life. He received encouragement and help from St. Philip Neri, who gave him his lodgings—along with the care of his cat! </p><p>In 1579, John formed the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, and published a compendium of Christian doctrine that remained in use until the 19th century. </p><p>Father Leonardi and his priests became a great power for good in Italy, and their congregation was confirmed by Pope Clement in 1595. He died at the age of 68 from a disease caught when tending those stricken by the plague. </p><p>By the deliberate policy of the founder, the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God have never had more than 15 churches and today form only a very small congregation.</p> American Catholic Blog Be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we are not contending against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.

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