AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

Where is God in suffering?

Yes, there is a great deal of suffering in this world. Isn't most of it, however, caused by an abuse of human freedom? Every day newspapers carry stories about human freedom used destructively.

God could prevent such tragedies by temporarily and selectively suspending human freedom to prevent its abuse. That would suggest that people never have to accept the consequences of their destructive decisions yet are free to claim responsibility for decisions with positive outcomes.

If God totally abolished human freedom, that would eliminate the positive uses of such freedom. Doesn't love require human freedom? Isn't our freedom part of being made in God's image and likeness? (See Genesis 1:27.)

Because I believe in a life beyond this one and because I believe that God is both good and just, then the abuse of human freedom cannot have the last word. God's values must prevail eventually.

Although I cannot control how other people use their freedom, I can and must decide how I will use mine. No one can do everything, but everyone can do something.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/15/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/17/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Blessing Cup
Prayer rituals for families and groups. Make every day an experience of faith and sharing!
New book from Mary Elizabeth Sperry
The Ten Commandments can change your life. Learn how!
New book
Teresa Tomeo and Cheryl Dickow help you unwrap the gifts God longs to give women.
New from Anthony Buono
The founder of Ave Maria Singles provides a candid look at the mistakes people make on their quest to find love.
New book, Holding Jesus
Reflections on Mary as a mother during the life of Jesus.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Margaret Mary
This 17th-century French nun helped to promote devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
St. Teresa of Avila
Throughout the centuries this saint's writings have provided a model for many who seek a deeper relationship with the Lord.
Year of Faith
"The Year of Faith is a summons to an authentic and renewed conversion to the Lord..." --Pope Benedict XVI
St. Gerard Majella
Many expectant mothers are comforted by trust in this saint’s prayers and intercession.
Year of Faith
"The Year of Faith is a summons to an authentic and renewed conversion to the Lord..." --Pope Benedict XVI



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic