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Daily Catholic Question

Where is God in suffering?

Yes, there is a great deal of suffering in this world. Isn't most of it, however, caused by an abuse of human freedom? Every day newspapers carry stories about human freedom used destructively.

God could prevent such tragedies by temporarily and selectively suspending human freedom to prevent its abuse. That would suggest that people never have to accept the consequences of their destructive decisions yet are free to claim responsibility for decisions with positive outcomes.

If God totally abolished human freedom, that would eliminate the positive uses of such freedom. Doesn't love require human freedom? Isn't our freedom part of being made in God's image and likeness? (See Genesis 1:27.)

Because I believe in a life beyond this one and because I believe that God is both good and just, then the abuse of human freedom cannot have the last word. God's values must prevail eventually.

Although I cannot control how other people use their freedom, I can and must decide how I will use mine. No one can do everything, but everyone can do something.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/15/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/17/2012


Catharine of Bologna: Some Franciscan saints led fairly public lives; Catharine represents the saints who served the Lord in obscurity. 
<p>Catharine, born in Bologna, was related to the nobility in Ferrara and was educated at court there. She received a liberal education at the court and developed some interest and talent in painting. In later years as a Poor Clare, Catharine sometimes did manuscript illumination and also painted miniatures. </p><p>At the age of 17, she joined a group of religious women in Ferrara. Four years later the whole group joined the Poor Clares in that city. Jobs as convent baker and portress preceded her selection as novice mistress. </p><p>In 1456, she and 15 other sisters were sent to establish a Poor Clare monastery in Florence. As abbess Catharine worked to preserve the peace of the new community. Her reputation for holiness drew many young women to the Poor Clare life. She was canonized in 1712.</p> American Catholic Blog Dear God, when you pour yourself into the little vase of my being, I suffer the agony of not being able to contain you. The inner walls of this heart feel as if they were about to burst, and I am surprised this has not happened already.


 
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