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Daily Catholic Question

Where is God in suffering?

Yes, there is a great deal of suffering in this world. Isn't most of it, however, caused by an abuse of human freedom? Every day newspapers carry stories about human freedom used destructively.

God could prevent such tragedies by temporarily and selectively suspending human freedom to prevent its abuse. That would suggest that people never have to accept the consequences of their destructive decisions yet are free to claim responsibility for decisions with positive outcomes.

If God totally abolished human freedom, that would eliminate the positive uses of such freedom. Doesn't love require human freedom? Isn't our freedom part of being made in God's image and likeness? (See Genesis 1:27.)

Because I believe in a life beyond this one and because I believe that God is both good and just, then the abuse of human freedom cannot have the last word. God's values must prevail eventually.

Although I cannot control how other people use their freedom, I can and must decide how I will use mine. No one can do everything, but everyone can do something.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/15/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/17/2012


Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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