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Daily Catholic Question

What is the correct place for the tabernacle?

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: “The tabernacle is to be situated ‘in churches in a most worthy place with the greatest honor.’ The dignity, placing and security of the eucharistic tabernacle should foster adoration before the Lord really present in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar.”

You could argue that the first sentence in this Catechism quote favors a central place in the sanctuary. Others could argue that, while respecting the reverence called for in the first sentence, the second sentence favors a place where individuals can get closer to the tabernacle for private prayer and adoration. The Church’s current liturgical directives favor this second interpretation.

The 1983 Code of Canon Law says, “The tabernacle in which the blessed Eucharist is reserved should be sited in a distinguished place in the church or oratory, a place which is conspicuous, suitably adorned and conducive to prayer” (#938,2).

Individuals can have honest differences of opinion about whether a particular site is “conspicuous, suitably adorned and conducive to prayer.” Most dioceses require that plans for new churches or major renovations of existing ones be approved by a diocesan commission appointed for this task.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Monday, October 15, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/14/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/16/2012


Jeanne Jugan: 
		<p>Born in northern France during the French Revolution—a time when congregations of women and men religious were being suppressed by the national government, Jeanne would eventually be highly praised in the French academy for her community's compassionate care of elderly poor people.</p>
		<p>When Jeanne was three and a half years old, her father, a fisherman, was lost at sea. Her widowed mother was hard pressed to raise her eight children (four died young) alone. At the age of 15 or 16, Jeanne became a kitchen maid for a family that not only cared for its own members, but also served poor, elderly people nearby. Ten years later, Jeanne became a nurse at the hospital in Le Rosais. Soon thereafter she joined a third order group founded by St. John Eudes (August 19).</p>
		<p>After six years she became a servant and friend of a woman she met through the third order. They prayed, visited the poor and taught catechism to children. After her friend's death, Jeanne and two other women continued a similar life in the city of Saint-Sevran. In 1839, they brought in their first permanent guest. They began an association, received more members and more guests. Mother Marie of the Cross, as Jeanne was now known, founded six more houses for the elderly by the end of 1849, all staffed by members of her association—the Little Sisters of the Poor. By 1853 the association numbered 500 and had houses as far away as England.</p>
		<p>Abbé Le Pailleur, a chaplain, had prevented Jeanne's reelection as superior in 1843; nine year later, he had her assigned to duties within the congregation, but would not allow her to be recognized as its founder. He was removed from office by the Holy See in 1890. </p>
		<p>By the time Pope Leo XIII gave her final approval to the community's constitutions in 1879, there were 2,400 Little Sisters of the Poor. Jeanne died later that same year, on August 30. Her cause was introduced in Rome in 1970, and she was beatified in 1982 and canonized in 2009. </p>
		<p> </p>
American Catholic Blog The people who know God well—the hermits, the prayerful people, those who risk everything to find God—always meet a lover, not a dictator. God is never found to be an abusive father or a manipulative mother, but a lover who is more than we dared hope for.

 
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