AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
Daily Catholic Question

Why must weddings take place in churches?

A wedding's location says something important about a couple, in what context they are pledging their undying love and who has a stake in the success of their marriage.

I think that most Roman Catholic dioceses in the United States have a regulation that the bishop's permission is needed for a wedding outside a church building.

Why? Marriage is a lifelong commitment, which the larger faith community has a responsibility to nurture. Linking weddings to buildings used by the faith community is one way of making that point.

Weddings are usually celebrated in church buildings for the same reason that Baptisms are celebrated there: That is where the faith community most often gathers.

That community certainly has a stake in the success of every marriage its members enter. Should problems arise in a marriage, will the husband and wife turn only to those who witnessed their exchange of vows?

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, October 11, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/10/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/12/2012


John Bosco: John Bosco’s theory of education could well be used in today’s schools. It was a preventive system, rejecting corporal punishment and placing students in surroundings removed from the likelihood of committing sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with one’s work, study and play. 
<p>Encouraged during his youth to become a priest so he could work with young boys, John was ordained in 1841. His service to young people started when he met a poor orphan and instructed him in preparation for receiving Holy Communion. He then gathered young apprentices and taught them catechism. </p><p>After serving as chaplain in a hospice for working girls, John opened the Oratory of St. Francis de Sales for boys. Several wealthy and powerful patrons contributed money, enabling him to provide two workshops for the boys, shoemaking and tailoring. </p><p>By 1856, the institution had grown to 150 boys and had added a printing press for publication of religious and catechetical pamphlets. His interest in vocational education and publishing justify him as patron of young apprentices and Catholic publishers. </p><p>John’s preaching fame spread and by 1850 he had trained his own helpers because of difficulties in retaining young priests. In 1854 he and his followers informally banded together, inspired by St. Francis de Sales [January 24]. </p><p>With Pope Pius IX’s encouragement, John gathered 17 men and founded the Salesians in 1859. Their activity concentrated on education and mission work. Later, he organized a group of Salesian Sisters to assist girls.</p> American Catholic Blog How do you expect to reach your own perfection by leading someone else’s life? His sanctity will never be yours; you must have the humility to work out your own salvation in a darkness where you are absolutely alone.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New book from Mary Elizabeth Sperry
The Ten Commandments can change your life. Learn how!
New book
Teresa Tomeo and Cheryl Dickow help you unwrap the gifts God longs to give women.
New from Anthony Buono
The founder of Ave Maria Singles provides a candid look at the mistakes people make on their quest to find love.
New book, Holding Jesus
Reflections on Mary as a mother during the life of Jesus.
New book
Learn about the sacraments of reconciliation and the anointing of the sick—and why we need them.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
50th Anniversary of Vatican II
The Church rejoices that on this date in 1962, Blessed Pope John opened the first session of the Second Vatican Council.
St. Daniel Comboni
The congregation founded by this Italian priest is known for spreading the Gospel throughout mission lands.
Thank You
Today, O God, we are full of gratitude for all you have given us.
Happy Birthday
We pray that God’s gifts will lead you to grow in wisdom and strength as you begin another year of life.
Respect Life Sunday
Catholic Greetings encourages you to support local and national efforts to protect and defend human life from conception to natural death.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015