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Daily Catholic Question

Why must weddings take place in churches?

A wedding's location says something important about a couple, in what context they are pledging their undying love and who has a stake in the success of their marriage.

I think that most Roman Catholic dioceses in the United States have a regulation that the bishop's permission is needed for a wedding outside a church building.

Why? Marriage is a lifelong commitment, which the larger faith community has a responsibility to nurture. Linking weddings to buildings used by the faith community is one way of making that point.

Weddings are usually celebrated in church buildings for the same reason that Baptisms are celebrated there: That is where the faith community most often gathers.

That community certainly has a stake in the success of every marriage its members enter. Should problems arise in a marriage, will the husband and wife turn only to those who witnessed their exchange of vows?

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, October 11, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 10/10/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/12/2012


Joseph of Cupertino: Joseph is most famous for levitating at prayer.
<p>Already as a child, Joseph showed a fondness for prayer. After a short career with the Capuchins, he joined the Conventuals. Following a brief assignment caring for the friary mule, Joseph began his studies for the priesthood. Though studies were very difficult for him, Joseph gained a great deal of knowledge from prayer. He was ordained in 1628.
</p><p>Joseph’s tendency to levitate during prayer was sometimes a cross; some people came to see this much as they might have gone to a circus sideshow. Joseph’s gift led him to be humble, patient and obedient, even though at times he was greatly tempted and felt forsaken by God. He fasted and wore iron chains for much of his life.
</p><p>The friars transferred Joseph several times for his own good and for the good of the rest of the community. He was reported to and investigated by the Inquisition; the examiners exonerated him.
</p><p>Joseph was canonized in 1767. In the investigation preceding the canonization, 70 incidents of levitation are recorded.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, help me to spread your fragrance wherever I go. Let me preach you without preaching, not by words but by my example, by the catching force, the sympathetic influence of what I do, the evident fullness of the love my heart bears for you. –Cardinal Newman

 
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