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Daily Catholic Question

Can the Gospel be proclaimed from memory at Mass?

Concerning the proclamation of the Gospel from memory, I put your question to Father Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M., who teaches liturgy at St. Meinrad Seminary. He responded:

"I know of no official (magisterium) statements about this; I consulted other colleagues and they too know of no statements. The practice is not sufficiently widespread to bring about any official comment...

"The more important issues are not the reading vs. reciting on the part of the priest, bishop or deacon but rather reading vs. listening on the part of the congregation. Faith comes by hearing, not by reading, Scripture says."

A recent newsletter from the U.S. bishops' liturgy committee states, "Just as the Church is obliged to faithfully proclaim the Bible as it has been passed on, the reader is obliged to faithfully proclaim the biblical text exactly as it appears in the Lectionary for Mass."

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Monday, October 1, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 9/30/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/2/2012


Cecilia: Although Cecilia is one of the most famous of the Roman martyrs, the familiar stories about her are apparently not founded on authentic material. There is no trace of honor being paid her in early times. A fragmentary inscription of the late fourth century refers to a church named after her, and her feast was celebrated at least in 545. 
<p>According to legend, Cecilia was a young Christian of high rank betrothed to a Roman named Valerian. Through her influence Valerian was converted, and was martyred along with his brother. The legend about Cecilia’s death says that after being struck three times on the neck with a sword, she lived for three days, and asked the pope to convert her home into a church. </p><p>Since the time of the Renaissance she has usually been portrayed with a viola or a small organ.</p> American Catholic Blog In our current culture, the concept of virtue is often considered outdated and old-fashioned, but for Catholics, becoming virtuous is essential for eternal salvation. Relativists and atheists don’t think so, but our Catholic faith holds that it is crucial.

 
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