AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement
Daily Catholic Question

Can the Gospel be proclaimed from memory at Mass?

Concerning the proclamation of the Gospel from memory, I put your question to Father Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M., who teaches liturgy at St. Meinrad Seminary. He responded:

"I know of no official (magisterium) statements about this; I consulted other colleagues and they too know of no statements. The practice is not sufficiently widespread to bring about any official comment...

"The more important issues are not the reading vs. reciting on the part of the priest, bishop or deacon but rather reading vs. listening on the part of the congregation. Faith comes by hearing, not by reading, Scripture says."

A recent newsletter from the U.S. bishops' liturgy committee states, "Just as the Church is obliged to faithfully proclaim the Bible as it has been passed on, the reader is obliged to faithfully proclaim the biblical text exactly as it appears in the Lectionary for Mass."

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Monday, October 1, 2012
Daily Catholic Question for 9/30/2012 Daily Catholic Question for 10/2/2012


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New book from Mary Elizabeth Sperry
The Ten Commandments can change your life. Learn how!
New book
Teresa Tomeo and Cheryl Dickow help you unwrap the gifts God longs to give women.
New from Anthony Buono
The founder of Ave Maria Singles provides a candid look at the mistakes people make on their quest to find love.
New book, Holding Jesus
Reflections on Mary as a mother during the life of Jesus.
New book
Learn about the sacraments of reconciliation and the anointing of the sick—and why we need them.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Thérèse of Lisieux
Remember this 19th-century saint, known and revered as the Little Flower, with a Catholic Greetings e-card.
Pet Blessings
Creator God, make us kind in our relationships with all your creatures and all creation.
Sts. Michael, Gabriel and Raphael, Archangels
Know someone named for one of the archangels? Send a name day e-card today to celebrate their feast.
Thank You
Show someone your gratitude for their kindness with a Catholic Greetings e-card.
St. Vincent de Paul
Send an e-card to show your appreciation for Vincent's followers, who give aid to our neighbors in distress.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic