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Daily Catholic Question

What do we know about St. Christopher?

We know very little more about him for sure. But stories and legends about him were formed, embroidered and added to over the centuries. The New Catholic Encyclopedia tells us the famous legend about him in which he carries the Christ Child on his shoulders while crossing a river.

Butler’s Lives of the Saints
, edited by Herbert Thurston, S.J., and Donald Attwater, says the legends about Christopher led to the belief that, if a person looked on an image of the saint, he or she would suffer no harm that day. Consequently, a statue or image of St. Christopher was often found at the church door.
That and the Christ Child story may explain why St. Christopher became the patron of travelers and why his statue is placed on the dashboard of many automobiles.

The liturgical celebration of Christopher’s feast was eliminated in the 1969 revision of the Roman Calendar. Prime targets in the reduction were saints with dubious legends and facts.

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Sunday, January 6, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/5/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/7/2013


Giles: Despite the fact that much about St. Giles is shrouded in mystery, we can say that he was one of the most popular saints in the Middle Ages. Likely, he was born in the first half of the seventh century in southeastern France. That is where he built a monastery that became a popular stopping-off point for pilgrims making their way to Compostela in Spain and the Holy Land.<br /><br />In England, many ancient churches and hospitals were dedicated to Giles. One of the sections of the city of Brussels is named after him. In Germany, Giles was included among the so-called 14 Holy Helpers, a popular group of saints to whom people prayed, especially for recovery from disease and for strength at the hour of death. Also among the 14 were Sts. Christopher, Barbara and Blaise. Interestingly, Giles was the only non-martyr among them. Devotion to the "Holy Helpers" was especially strong in parts of Germany and in Hungary and Sweden. Such devotion made his popularity spread. Giles was soon invoked as the patron of the poor and the disabled.<br /><br />The pilgrimage center that once drew so many fell into disrepair some centuries after Giles' death. American Catholic Blog The ascension is about the final reunion of what appeared to be separated for a while: earth and heaven, human and divine, matter and Spirit. If the Christ is the archetype of the full human journey, now we know how it all resolves itself in the end. “So that where I am, you also will be” (John 14:3).

 
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