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Daily Catholic Question

Can a transsexual be married in the Church?

I presume here we are talking about an individual who had no female sex organs before surgery. I presume a male had his male genitalia removed and was given a plastic or artificially created vagina of a kind.

I think that any Catholic pastor would have to refuse to witness a ceremony uniting a male to a female transsexual. If such a ceremony took place, I believe, a Catholic tribunal asked to judge the case would declare the marriage null and void.

Said my tribunal source, "One who is biologically and physiologically male at birth may have his genital organ altered to resemble those of a female, but he remains essentially a male. He is thus incapable of marrying another male."

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Friday, January 4, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/3/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/5/2013


Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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