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Daily Catholic Question

Why is the King James Bible missing some books?

I have noticed that the Catholic Bible includes the Books of Tobias and Judith. Do you know why the Protestants excluded them from the King James Version?

Over the centuries Christians debated not just what books of the Jews were to be regarded as inspired but also what books written by Christians should be regarded as Scripture. When Martin Luther translated the Bible, he followed the Jamnian (Palestinian) Canon and omitted certain Old Testament books. The Council of Trent then definitively pronounced what books were to be held as inspired. Trent followed the Greek Septuagint translation (Alexandrian Canon), including those books not in the Jamnian Canon.

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Saturday, January 26, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/25/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/27/2013

Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
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