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Daily Catholic Question

What is the 1999 Catholic-Lutheran agreement?

I heard there's a document that is intended to unite all Christians under one umbrella, regardless of denomination. Where can I find more information on this subject?

I think you have been hearing about a historic agreement between Roman Catholics and Lutherans—not a document to unite all Christians. A Joint Declaration on Justification was signed in 1999, on behalf of the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation. This document reflects 30 years of ecumenical dialogue between these two Churches and ends a 400-year-old doctrinal dispute. You can be sure the Church would not have approved this new document if it compromised the Catholic faith. Your best source of information is your diocesan newspaper, Catholic magazines and official Catholic and Lutheran publications. You'll find a good article on this website from an find the text for this joint declaration at www.zenit.org/english on the Internet or at a public library.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/22/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/24/2013


Visitation: This is a fairly late feast, going back only to the 13th or 14th century. It was established widely throughout the Church to pray for unity. The present date of celebration was set in 1969 in order to follow the Annunciation of the Lord (March 25) and precede the Nativity of John the Baptist (June 24). 
<p>Like most feasts of Mary, it is closely connected with Jesus and his saving work. The more visible actors in the visitation drama (see Luke 1:39-45) are Mary and Elizabeth. However, Jesus and John the Baptist steal the scene in a hidden way. Jesus makes John leap with joy—the joy of messianic salvation. Elizabeth, in turn, is filled with the Holy Spirit and addresses words of praise to Mary—words that echo down through the ages. </p><p>It is helpful to recall that we do not have a journalist’s account of this meeting. Rather, Luke, speaking for the Church, gives a prayerful poet’s rendition of the scene. Elizabeth’s praise of Mary as “the mother of my Lord” can be viewed as the earliest Church’s devotion to Mary. As with all authentic devotion to Mary, Elizabeth’s (the Church’s) words first praise God for what God has done to Mary. Only secondly does she praise Mary for trusting God’s words. </p><p>Then comes the Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55). Here Mary herself (like the Church) traces all her greatness to God.</p> American Catholic Blog Someone once told Pope Francis that his words had inspired him to give a lot more to the poor. Pope Francis’s response was to challenge the man not to just give money, but to roll up his sleeves, get his hands dirty, and actually reach out and help.

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