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Daily Catholic Question

How did San Antonio, Texas, get its name?

Can you tell me why Texas named a city for St. Anthony?

According to the encyclopedias, in 1691 a Spanish expedition camped at a little-known village that was in present-day Texas. The New Catholic Encyclopedia explains that the Franciscan chaplain of the expedition named the site for St. Anthony of Padua, whose feast was being celebrated that day. It was not until 1718 that a mission was established at San Antonio.

When the Republic of Texas and later the State of Texas took over the territory, there already existed the Spanish-named city of San Antonio. A look at a map will tell you the Spanish often named cities for a saint. Cities grew up around a Catholic mission named for a saint and took the name of the mission.

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Monday, January 21, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/20/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/22/2013


Michael Giedroyc: A life of physical pain and mental torment didn’t prevent Michael Giedroyc from achieving holiness. 
<p>Born near Vilnius, Lithuania, Michael suffered from physical and permanent handicaps from birth. He was a dwarf who had the use of only one foot. Because of his delicate physical condition, his formal education was frequently interrupted. But over time, Michael showed special skills at metalwork. Working with bronze and silver, he created sacred vessels, including chalices.</p><p>He traveled to Kraków, Poland, where he joined the Augustinians. He received permission to live the life of a hermit in a cell adjoining the monastery. There Michael spent his days in prayer, fasted and abstained from all meat and lived to an old age. Though he knew the meaning of suffering throughout his years, his rich spiritual life brought him consolation. Michael’s long life ended in 1485 in Kraków.</p><p>Five hundred years later, Pope John Paul II visited the city and spoke to the faculty of the Pontifical Academy of Theology. The 15th century in Kraków, the pope said, was “the century of saints.” Among those he cited was Blessed Michael Giedroyc.</p> American Catholic Blog The French novelist Leon Bloy once said that there is only one tragedy in life: not to be a saint. It may be that God permits some suffering as the only way to wake someone from a dream of self-sufficiency and illusory happiness.

Divine Science Michael Dennin

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Martin L. King, Jr. Birthday Celebrated (U.S.)
On this holiday we remember and strive to imitate Martin Luther King Jr.’s commitment to peace.

Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity
Loving God, give us imagination and courage to build your Church together in unity and in love.

First Sunday in Lent
Assure your parish’s newly Elect of your prayers as they journey toward Easter.

Birthday
Make the most of God's graces and blessings throughout the coming year.

Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity
Lord, we pray this week that all Christians may be one as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are One.




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