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Daily Catholic Question

How did San Antonio, Texas, get its name?

Can you tell me why Texas named a city for St. Anthony?

According to the encyclopedias, in 1691 a Spanish expedition camped at a little-known village that was in present-day Texas. The New Catholic Encyclopedia explains that the Franciscan chaplain of the expedition named the site for St. Anthony of Padua, whose feast was being celebrated that day. It was not until 1718 that a mission was established at San Antonio.

When the Republic of Texas and later the State of Texas took over the territory, there already existed the Spanish-named city of San Antonio. A look at a map will tell you the Spanish often named cities for a saint. Cities grew up around a Catholic mission named for a saint and took the name of the mission.

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Monday, January 21, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/20/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/22/2013


Casimir: Casimir, born of kings and in line (third among 13 children) to be a king himself, was filled with exceptional values and learning by a great teacher, John Dlugosz. Even his critics could not say that his conscientious objection indicated softness. Even as a teenager, Casimir lived a highly disciplined, even severe life, sleeping on the ground, spending a great part of the night in prayer and dedicating himself to lifelong celibacy. 
<p>When nobles in Hungary became dissatisfied with their king, they prevailed upon Casimir’s father, the king of Poland, to send his son to take over the country. Casimir obeyed his father, as many young men over the centuries have obeyed their government. The army he was supposed to lead was clearly outnumbered by the “enemy”; some of his troops were deserting because they were not paid. At the advice of his officers, Casimir decided to return home. </p><p>His father was irked at the failure of his plans, and confined his 15-year-old son for three months. The lad made up his mind never again to become involved in the wars of his day, and no amount of persuasion could change his mind. He returned to prayer and study, maintaining his decision to remain celibate even under pressure to marry the emperor’s daughter. </p><p>He reigned briefly as king of Poland during his father’s absence. He died of lung trouble at 23 while visiting Lithuania, of which he was also Grand Duke. He was buried in Vilnius, Lithuania.</p> American Catholic Blog We renew and deepen our dedication to God and express that by sacrificing something meaningful to us. But as we go about our fasting and almsgiving, let’s not forget to give him some extra time in prayer.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Martin L. King, Jr. Birthday Celebrated (U.S.)
On this holiday we remember and strive to imitate Martin Luther King Jr.’s commitment to peace.

Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity
Loving God, give us imagination and courage to build your Church together in unity and in love.

First Sunday in Lent
Assure your parish’s newly Elect of your prayers as they journey toward Easter.

Birthday
Make the most of God's graces and blessings throughout the coming year.

Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity
Lord, we pray this week that all Christians may be one as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are One.




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