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Daily Catholic Question

Are there differences in Protestant and Catholic Bibles?

The Catholic Bible contains more books than Protestant translations. Why?

The Books of the Bible were written as individual books or writings. Over the course of thousands of years, not everyone has agreed upon which books are inspired. When the Reformation came along, Martin Luther translated the Palestinian Canon, which leaders of the Reformation have followed since. The Church has authoritatively defined the canon following the Greek (Alexandrian) Canon, which includes the books now contained in the Catholic translations of the Bible. The differences between Protestant translations and Catholic translations of the Bible are in the Old Testament or Hebrew Scriptures. Today many Protestant translations of the Bible contain the additional Catholic books, calling them by the name of Apocrypha. Catholic scholars use the term deutero-canonical for these books unique to the canon used by Catholics and Orthodox.

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Saturday, January 19, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/18/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/20/2013

Andrew: Andrew was St. Peter’s brother, and was called with him. "As [Jesus] was walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is now called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, ‘Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.’ At once they left their nets and followed him" (Matthew 4:18-20). 
<p>John the Evangelist presents Andrew as a disciple of John the Baptist. When Jesus walked by one day, John said, "Behold, the Lamb of God." Andrew and another disciple followed Jesus. "Jesus turned and saw them following him and said to them, ‘What are you looking for?’ They said to him, ‘Rabbi (which translated means Teacher), where are you staying?’ He said to them, ‘Come, and you will see.’ So they went and saw where he was staying, and they stayed with him that day" (John 1:38-39a). </p><p>Little else is said about Andrew in the Gospels. Before the multiplication of the loaves, it was Andrew who spoke up about the boy who had the barley loaves and fishes (see John 6:8-9). When the Gentiles went to see Jesus, they came to Philip, but Philip then had recourse to Andrew (see John 12:20-22). </p><p>Legend has it that Andrew preached the Good News in what is now modern Greece and Turkey and was crucified at Patras.</p> American Catholic Blog We look ahead to the coming of the Son of Man, standing erect and with heads held high. We live in hope, not in fear. Our experience of God is no longer limited by human weakness or even human sinfulness. God has always been one step ahead of us, with a plan that exceeds our greatest desires.

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