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Daily Catholic Question

How should we receive Communion?

What are the accepted, recommended or unaccepted ways, currently, to receive the host?  Is it o.k. to dip the host in the cup? 

In speaking of receiving or communicating the consecrated bread or host the Instruction sometimes speaks simply of doing so in "the usual manner." The Instruction usually speaks of receiving and not taking. When giving the Body of the Lord to a communicant, the minister raises the host over the vessel and says, ‘The body of Christ.’ After the communicant has responded, ‘Amen,’ the host is placed carefully on the tongue or on the outstretched palm of the left hand." In my experience that is how Communion in the hand is and has been taught.

I think it safe to say that almost all, if not all, Roman Catholic liturgists discourage Communion by intinction. The sign value in intinction is not as full as drinking from the cup. I should think the reasons for an alcoholic priest communicating by intinction are obvious. In many cases the minimum of the consecrated wine thus consumed will not trigger the urge to drink. This is more important than the fuller sign value of drinking from the cup.

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Friday, January 18, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/17/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/19/2013


Lazarus: Lazarus, the friend of Jesus, the brother of Martha and Mary, was the one of whom the Jews said, "See how much he loved him." In their sight Jesus raised his friend Lazarus from the dead. 
<p>Legends abound about the life of Lazarus after the death and resurrection of Jesus. He is supposed to have left a written account of what he saw in the next world before he was called back to life. Some say he followed Peter into Syria. Another story is that despite being put into a leaking boat by the Jews at Jaffa, he, his sisters and others landed safely in Cyprus. There he died peacefully after serving as bishop for 30 years. </p><p>A church was built in his honor in Constantinople and some of his reputed relics were transferred there in 890. A Western legend has the oarless boat arriving in Gaul. There he was bishop of Marseilles, was martyred after making a number of converts and was buried in a cave. His relics were transferred to the new cathedral in Autun in 1146. </p><p>It is certain there was early devotion to the saint. Around the year 390, the pilgrim lady Etheria talks of the procession that took place on the Saturday before Palm Sunday at the tomb where Lazarus had been raised from the dead. In the West, Passion Sunday was called <i>Dominica de Lazaro</i>, and Augustine tells us that in Africa the Gospel of the raising of Lazarus was read at the office of Palm Sunday.</p> American Catholic Blog We need do no more than we are doing at present; that is, to love divine Providence and abandon ourselves in His arms and heart.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
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Would someone you know make a good priest? Use Catholic Greetings today to send him a prayer.



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Prayer for Vocations
Each January the Church reminds us to pray for all vocations: priesthood, religious, married, and single life.




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