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Daily Catholic Question

Is there a saint with my name?

Is there a saint for my name, Cynthia? 

Cynthia is the feminine form of Synesius. In Greek the name means "understanding."  A very short biography says that Synesius was a Roman martyr beheaded in 279 under Emperor Aurelian. December 12 is assigned as Synesius's feast day. St. Diana is also known as Cynthia. A worldly young woman, she was converted by a sermon she heard. She died in 1236. Her feast is June 9.

For more information on patron saints and name saints, visit Saint of the Day.

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/15/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/17/2013


Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog In prayer we discover what we already have. You start where you are and you deepen what you already have and you realize that you are already there. We already have everything, but we don’t know it and we don’t experience it.

 
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