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Daily Catholic Question

What does the Bible say about Caleb?

You will find what we know about Caleb in the Books of Numbers and Joshua. Caleb was the son of Jephunneh of the tribe of Judah. Numbers lists him among the 12 Moses sent to reconnoiter the land of Canaan (Chapters 13—14). They were told to report on the population of the land, their military strength, the fertility of the soil, etc.

All recognized the bounty of the crops. But none besides Caleb urged trying to take possession. The others were fearful and defeatist.

When the people threatened revolt and rejection of Moses and Aaron, Caleb with Joshua urged fidelity to God. Because of Caleb's "different spirit," God promised to bring him into the promised land along with Joshua while those rebelling wander in the desert without entering the land.

In Joshua 14—15 Caleb reminded Joshua, who succeeded Moses, of God's promise. Joshua then gave Hebron to Caleb and Caleb drove out the Anakim people.

Click here for the rest of today's answer

Thursday, January 10, 2013
Daily Catholic Question for 1/9/2013 Daily Catholic Question for 1/11/2013


Jutta of Thuringia: Today's patroness of Prussia began her life amidst luxury and power but died the death of a simple servant of the poor.
<p>In truth, virtue and piety were always of prime importance to Jutta and her husband, both of noble rank. The two were set to make a pilgrimage together to the holy places in Jerusalem, but her husband died on the way. The newly widowed Jutta, after taking care to provide for her children, resolved to live in a manner utterly pleasing to God. She disposed of the costly clothes, jewels and furniture befitting one of her rank, and became a Secular Franciscan, taking on the simple garment of a religious.
</p><p>From that point her life was utterly devoted to others: caring for the sick, particularly lepers; tending to the poor, whom she visited in their hovels; helping the crippled and blind with whom she shared her own home. Many of the townspeople of Thuringia laughed at how the once-distinguished lady now spent all her time. But Jutta saw the face of God in the poor and felt honored to render whatever services she could.
</p><p>About the year 1260, not long before her death, Jutta lived near the non-Christians in eastern Germany. There she built a small hermitage and prayed unceasingly for their conversion. She has been venerated for centuries as the special patron of Prussia.</p> American Catholic Blog The confessional is not the dry-cleaner’s; it is an encounter with Jesus, with that Jesus who is waiting for us, who is waiting for us as we are.

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