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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Into the Abyss

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

On October 24, 2001, Jason Burkett and Michael Perry, both 19, murdered Sandra Stoler, her son Adam, and his friend Jeremy Richardson in Conroe, TX, so they could steal Sandra Stoler’s red Camaro.
 
Both Burkett and Perry were found guilty; Burkett got life in prison and Perry was sentenced to death. Perry exhausted all of his appeals and was executed by the State of Texas by lethal injection on Jul 1, 2010.
 
Director Werner Herzog has created a quiet, pensive documentary that never rushes. His voice is quiet and non-judgmental and he evokes deep responses. It’s like watching 48 Hours or Dateline crime show on slow motion. He interviews friends of the accused and family and friends of those who were killed. He revisits the crime scenes with law enforcement officers on duty during the days of the killing to the shoot out and capture of Burkett and Perry.
 
The strongest part of the film, for me, was the interview with captain of corrections, Fred Allen. He led the tie-down team for 130 executions before resigning after the execution of Karla Faye Tucker in 1998. He lost his pension when he resigned but could not do it any more and questions the morality of the death penalty; he no longer believes anyone has the right to take the life of another human being.
 
Herzog treats his subject with an even hand, even the woman who married Burkett in prison and somehow became pregnant with his child without conjugal visits.  At the end Adam Stoler’s sister says that she is doesn’t want to seem like an evil person but that she is glad she went to the execution. Herzog then asks her if the death penalty is something she thinks Jesus would do. She replies, “Probably not.”
 
The opening interview is with a chaplain who describes his role and you cannot almost see his heart break. If the executed have no one to claim their bodies, they are buried in the prison cemetery, each grave marked by a cross with numbers; no names; a reminder of how many of the executed were poor and probably had inadequate defense.
 
I think The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains Catholic teaching very clearly in paragraph 2267):
“Assuming that the guilty party's identity and responsibility have been fully determined, the traditional teaching of the Church does not exclude recourse to the death penalty, if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor.
“If, however, non-lethal means are sufficient to defend and protect people's safety from the aggressor, authority will limit itself to such means, as these are more in keeping with the concrete conditions of the common good and more in conformity to the dignity of the human person.
“Today, in fact, as a consequence of the possibilities which the state has for effectively preventing crime, by rendering one who has committed an offense incapable of doing harm - without definitely taking away from him the possibility of redeeming himself - the cases in which the execution of the offender is an absolute necessity ‘are very rare, if not practically nonexistent.’"

Since 2000, there have been 278 murders carried out by the State of Texas. According to the website of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice on November 17, six executions are scheduled for January – March 2012. 234 executions have been carried out since Governor Rick Perry became governor in December 2000.
 
The five countries that have executed the most people since 2007 are Pakistan, the United States, Iraq, Iran, and China.
 
As former death house officer Fred Allen says in “Into the Abyss”, we need to abolish the death penalty and it is so easy to do it. We just have to change the law.




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Philip Neri: Philip Neri was a sign of contradiction, combining popularity with piety against the background of a corrupt Rome and a disinterested clergy, the whole post-Renaissance malaise. 
<p>At an early age, he abandoned the chance to become a businessman, moved to Rome from Florence and devoted his life and individuality to God. After three years of philosophy and theology studies, he gave up any thought of ordination. The next 13 years were spent in a vocation unusual at the time—that of a layperson actively engaged in prayer and the apostolate. </p><p>As the Council of Trent (1545-63) was reforming the Church on a doctrinal level, Philip’s appealing personality was winning him friends from all levels of society, from beggars to cardinals. He rapidly gathered around himself a group of laypersons won over by his audacious spirituality. Initially they met as an informal prayer and discussion group, and also served poor people in Rome. </p><p>At the urging of his confessor, he was ordained a priest and soon became an outstanding confessor, gifted with the knack of piercing the pretenses and illusions of others, though always in a charitable manner and often with a joke. He arranged talks, discussions and prayers for his penitents in a room above the church. He sometimes led “excursions” to other churches, often with music and a picnic on the way. </p><p>Some of his followers became priests and lived together in community. This was the beginning of the Oratory, the religious institute he founded. A feature of their life was a daily afternoon service of four informal talks, with vernacular hymns and prayers. Giovanni Palestrina was one of Philip’s followers, and composed music for the services. </p><p>The Oratory was finally approved after suffering through a period of accusations of being an assembly of heretics, where laypersons preached and sang vernacular hymns! (Cardinal Newman founded the first English-speaking house of the Oratory three centuries later.) </p><p>Philip’s advice was sought by many of the prominent figures of his day. He is one of the influential figures of the Counter-Reformation, mainly for converting to personal holiness many of the influential people within the Church itself. His characteristic virtues were humility and gaiety.</p> American Catholic Blog We need do no more than we are doing at present; that is, to love divine Providence and abandon ourselves in his arms and heart.<br />—St. Padre Pio

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