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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Non-Stop

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Liam Neeson stars in a scene from the movie "Non-Stop."
Tired of airport pat-downs? They're nothing compared to the severe smackdowns administered by troubled air marshal Bill Marks (Liam Neeson) as he slams his way through the popcorn thriller "Non-Stop" (Universal).

Though Marks' rough ways—together with a bit of risque humor—set this turbulent trip off limits for kids, most grownups will likely handle the bumps along the way without much difficulty.

Haunted by a family tragedy, Marks has a drinking problem -- as well as an explosive temper -- and is barely holding on to his job when he's assigned to protect a typical overnight flight from New York to London. All sense of routine goes by the wayside, however, when an anonymous passenger sends Marks a text threatening to kill one of his fellow travelers every 20 minutes until a hefty payout is wired into his bank account.

Marks swings into action, but he's bewildered to find that his unknown adversary is making it appear as though Marks himself is the one doing the killing. That account, for instance, turns out to be in the marshal's name.

Marks enlists the help of sympathetic newfound acquaintance Jen Summers (Julianne Moore). Seated next to each other, the two have been chatting in a mildly flirtatious way. He also draws on the aid of veteran stewardess and longtime friend Nancy (Michelle Dockery).

But mutual mistrust—Just who is Jen? How well does Nancy really know Marks?—hampers the trio's efforts to identify and stop the perpetrator.

The rapid pace and frequent plot twists of director Jaume Collet-Serra's thriller divert attention from its improbabilities. As with Agatha Christie's "Murder on the Orient Express," genuine suspense pervades the proceedings because every single person onboard is a potential suspect. Marks, however, is no Hercule Poirot; he relies far more on his big white knuckles than his little gray cells.

Without incurring the guilt of spoilers, the solution to it all can be said to involve a surprisingly laudable goal pursued in a deeply immoral manner. So to the degree that this jump across the puddle carries any ethical cargo, it's the familiar maxim that good ends do not justify sinful means.

The film contains considerable harsh but mostly bloodless violence, brief nongraphic sexual activity between incidental characters, some adult references, numerous uses of profanity, at least one instance of the F-word as well as several crude and crass terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Josephine Bakhita: For many years, Josephine Bakhita was a slave but her spirit was always free and eventually that spirit prevailed. 
<p>Born in Olgossa in the Darfur region of southern Sudan, Josephine was kidnapped at the age of seven, sold into slavery and given the name Bakhita, which means <i>fortunate</i>. She was re-sold several times, finally in 1883 to Callisto Legnani, Italian consul in Khartoum, Sudan. </p><p>Two years later he took Josephine to Italy and gave her to his friend Augusto Michieli. Bakhita became babysitter to Mimmina Michieli, whom she accompanied to Venice's Institute of the Catechumens, run by the Canossian Sisters. While Mimmina was being instructed, Josephine felt drawn to the Catholic Church. She was baptized and confirmed in 1890, taking the name Josephine. </p><p>When the Michielis returned from Africa and wanted to take Mimmina and Josephine back with them, the future saint refused to go. During the ensuing court case, the Canossian sisters and the patriarch of Venice intervened on Josephine's behalf. The judge concluded that since slavery was illegal in Italy, she had actually been free since 1885. </p><p>Josephine entered the Institute of St. Magdalene of Canossa in 1893 and made her profession three years later. In 1902, she was transferred to the city of Schio (northeast of Verona), where she assisted her religious community through cooking, sewing, embroidery and welcoming visitors at the door. She soon became well loved by the children attending the sisters' school and the local citizens. She once said, "Be good, love the Lord, pray for those who do not know Him. What a great grace it is to know God!" </p><p>The first steps toward her beatification began in 1959. She was beatified in 1992 and canonized eight years later.</p> American Catholic Blog St. Paul talks about the Christian life as a race, and encourages us to run so as to win. So it’s not just OK, it’s commanded to be competitive, to strive to excel. But true greatness consists in sharing in the sacrificial love of Christ, who comes to serve rather than to be served. That means that this race St. Paul is talking about is a race to the bottom.

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