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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Robocop

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Joel Kinnaman stars in Columbia Pictures' "Robocop."
Man and machine merge—for the fourth time—in "Robocop" (Columbia), the latest installment in the science-fiction franchise.

Not surprisingly, this remake serves up some of the mindless mayhem and gratuitous violence of the 1987 original, which has become a cult classic. But in this go-round, it's not all blood and guts. Director Jose Padilha ("Secrets of the Tribe") has also crafted a clever action thriller with timely messages about greed, corruption, and the dangers of playing God.

In the year 2028, the world is at peace, thanks to an army of robots which patrols hotspots overseas. Their manufacturer, the Detroit-based conglomerate OmniCorp, touts the advantage of their product: American lives are no longer sacrificed in wars for the cause of freedom.

The only place OmniCorp's bots are not welcome is at home; they're banned from policing by an act of Congress. Americans are "robo-phobic" (rightly so), suspicious of machines that cannot "feel" and that, therefore, are unlikely to value human life properly.

Score one for Congress. But, alas, corrupt politicians can be bought, and laws changed. Such is the goal of wicked OmniCorp CEO Raymond Sellars (Michael Keaton). He's convinced that a meld of human and robot would make at least partially mechanical cops more palatable to Americans, thereby enriching OmniCorp beyond its wildest dreams.

"Americans want a product with a conscience," he says.

Sellars persuades his reluctant lead scientist, Dr. Dennett Norton (Gary Oldman), to find the solution -- and a human guinea pig. Enter Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman), loving family man and honest cop fighting crime and corruption on the mean streets of the Motor City.

When Alex runs afoul of the mob and is critically injured in a bomb attack, he is transported to Dr. Norton's lab. Alex's hysterical wife, Clara (Abbie Cornish), thinking she will get her husband back in one piece, consents to his transformation. The result: Alex becomes Iron Man—make that Robocop—and a new crime-fighting mechanism is born.

"Robocop" barrels down a predictable road as Alex's handlers discover that their creation has a mind of his own—and an agenda not necessarily to their liking. Alex struggles with his new identity and longs to return to the family fold.

But first, old scores must be settled and justice served, all under the watchful eye of smarmy tabloid-news program host Pat Novak (Samuel L. Jackson).

"This is the future of American justice!" Novak intones, as another baddie bites the dust.

The film contains intense action violence, including gunplay, and some profane and rough language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Joseph of Cupertino: Joseph is most famous for levitating at prayer.
<p>Already as a child, Joseph showed a fondness for prayer. After a short career with the Capuchins, he joined the Conventuals. Following a brief assignment caring for the friary mule, Joseph began his studies for the priesthood. Though studies were very difficult for him, Joseph gained a great deal of knowledge from prayer. He was ordained in 1628.
</p><p>Joseph’s tendency to levitate during prayer was sometimes a cross; some people came to see this much as they might have gone to a circus sideshow. Joseph’s gift led him to be humble, patient and obedient, even though at times he was greatly tempted and felt forsaken by God. He fasted and wore iron chains for much of his life.
</p><p>The friars transferred Joseph several times for his own good and for the good of the rest of the community. He was reported to and investigated by the Inquisition; the examiners exonerated him.
</p><p>Joseph was canonized in 1767. In the investigation preceding the canonization, 70 incidents of levitation are recorded.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, help me to spread your fragrance wherever I go. Let me preach you without preaching, not by words but by my example, by the catching force, the sympathetic influence of what I do, the evident fullness of the love my heart bears for you. –Cardinal Newman

 
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