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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

About Time

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Domhnall Gleeson stars in a scene from the movie "About Time."
If you could play God, would you—or should you? That big question is at the heart of the romantic comedy "About Time" (Universal).

Written and directed by Richard Curtis ("Notting Hill," "Love Actually"), "About Time" is a wish-fulfillment fantasy about changing your destiny at will, in this instance to win the love of your life. It's a tempting confection, but with a bitter aftertaste. The manipulation of others for selfish reasons, coupled with disrespect for the role of divine providence in one's life, may leave the viewer feeling empty rather than satisfied.

On his 21st birthday, Tim (Domhnall Gleeson) is given a rather unusual present by his father (Bill Nighy). He informs his shy, insecure son that the men in the family possess a special gift: They can travel back in time. It's as easy as finding a dark space, clenching your fists, thinking of a specific moment, and you're there.

Dad offers few guidelines on how to use this ability other than a command to have "an extraordinary life." So the newly confident Tim jumps inside his bedroom wardrobe (shades of Narnia) and travels back to New Year's Eve to kiss the girl he was too shy to the first go-round.

And so Tim discovers his purpose in life: to use time travel to land a girlfriend, fall in love, and have a perfect, happy life.

At first it seems so easy. Tim meets Mary (Rachel McAdams) at a restaurant, and decides she's the one. Multiple do-overs back in time refine and, ultimately, seal the deal.

This is where "About Time" intersects 1993's "Groundhog Day." Unlike that charming film, where the hero betters himself as well as the world around him, "About Time" takes a more narrow view. Tim is only interested in his own happiness. In fact, when he tries to change the past of others (for their own good), he decides not to, as the consequences of doing so would have an adverse effect on his own carefully manufactured "happiness."

In the end, "About Time" reconciles fantasy with reality, with a message about appreciating life as it naturally unfolds, accepting the good while dealing with the bad. Unfortunately, the journey to that weepy, overly sentimental resolution is riddled with distasteful and sometimes sacrilegious "humor." The film contains semi-graphic premarital sexual activity, brief nudity, several vulgar gestures, some sacrilegious humor and sexual innuendo, and much profanity and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Scholastica: Twins often share the same interests and ideas with an equal intensity. Therefore, it is no surprise that Scholastica and her twin brother, Benedict (July 11), established religious communities within a few miles from each other. 
<p>Born in 480 of wealthy parents, Scholastica and Benedict were brought up together until he left central Italy for Rome to continue his studies. </p><p>Little is known of Scholastica’s early life. She founded a religious community for women near Monte Cassino at Plombariola, five miles from where her brother governed a monastery. </p><p>The twins visited each other once a year in a farmhouse because Scholastica was not permitted inside the monastery. They spent these times discussing spiritual matters. </p><p>According to the <i>Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great</i>, the brother and sister spent their last day together in prayer and conversation. Scholastica sensed her death was close at hand and she begged Benedict to stay with her until the next day. </p><p>He refused her request because he did not want to spend a night outside the monastery, thus breaking his own Rule. Scholastica asked God to let her brother remain and a severe thunderstorm broke out, preventing Benedict and his monks from returning to the abbey. </p><p>Benedict cried out, “God forgive you, Sister. What have you done?” Scholastica replied, “I asked a favor of you and you refused. I asked it of God and he granted it.” </p><p>Brother and sister parted the next morning after their long discussion. Three days later, Benedict was praying in his monastery and saw the soul of his sister rising heavenward in the form of a white dove. Benedict then announced the death of his sister to the monks and later buried her in the tomb he had prepared for himself.</p> American Catholic Blog In all the sacraments, Christ gives to us the transforming power of his love, which we call “grace.” But in the Eucharist, and only in the Eucharist, Jesus gives us even more. He gives us his entire self—Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity. Of course, the proper response to a gift of this magnitude is gratitude.

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