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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Free Birds

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


The president of the United States, voiced by Jimmy Hayward, and Reggie, voiced by Owen Wilson, are seen in the animated movie "Free Birds."
Parents be warned: Your kids will want you to revise the Thanksgiving dinner menu once they see "Free Birds" (Relativity), a 3-D animated adventure about two rogue turkeys who travel back in time to change the "main course" of history.

Jimmy Hayward ("Horton Hears a Who!") directs this zany but good-natured comedy, co-written with Scott Mosier (and having nothing to do with the Lynyrd Skynyrd song "Free Bird"). There's something for every age wrapped up in a holiday-themed package, including cute-as-a-button characters, clever (but sometimes a bit rude) humor, a send-up of science fiction, and even a little (superficial) slice of American history.

There's also a good message for the youngest viewers: Look out for each other, or someone may end up as dinner (literally).

Our turkey hero, Reggie (voice of Owen Wilson), is an outcast on the farm. He doesn't follow the dimwitted flock, and his warnings about the farmer and his ax go unheeded—until, for some, it's too late.

"Thanksgiving is a turkey's worst nightmare," Reggie says.

Out of nowhere, the president of the United States (voiced by director Hayward) arrives to choose a turkey to receive the official pardon prior to the national holiday. Reggie's the one, and he is whisked to Camp David, where he lives in the lap of luxury.

Before long he is addicted to pizza ("much better than corn") and obsessed with watching a romantic telenovela on TV.

His strange interlude ends when he is abducted by fellow bird Jake (voice of Woody Harrelson). As the founder of the "Turkey Freedom Front," Jake enlists Reggie on a wild scheme: travel back to the first Thanksgiving in 1621, and keep turkey off the dinner table.

And so these turkeys hijack a time machine (voiced by George Takei of "Star Trek" fame) and land in Plymouth, Mass. There they meet up with their feathered ancestors, led by Chief Broadbeak (voice of Keith David) and his spunky daughter, Jenny (voice of Amy Poehler).

For Reggie and Jenny, it's love at first peck, while Jake butts beaks with Jenny's tough brother, Ranger (also voiced by Hayward), over leadership of the master plan.

The Pilgrims are a bumbling lot, grousing over the lack of food and ganging up on Governor Bradford (voice of Dan Fogler). It's left to the sadistic Myles Standish (voice of Colm Meaney) and his pack of vicious dogs to hunt down the turkeys in time for that first dinner with the native Indians.

A rollicking adventure ensues, with echoes of the great escape in 2000's "Chicken Run." While some of the action sequences may be too intense at times for younger viewers ("Those turkeys are angry birds," one Pilgrim quips), it's all in good fun, and the tasty resolution, involving one of America's favorite foods, is bound to please.

The film contains a few mildly perilous situations and some rude humor. The Catholic News Service classification is A-I—general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Monica: The circumstances of St. Monica’s life could have made her a nagging wife, a bitter daughter-in-law and a despairing parent, yet she did not give way to any of these temptations. Although she was a Christian, her parents gave her in marriage to a pagan, Patricius, who lived in her hometown of Tagaste in North Africa. Patricius had some redeeming features, but he had a violent temper and was licentious. Monica also had to bear with a cantankerous mother-in-law who lived in her home. Patricius criticized his wife because of her charity and piety, but always respected her. Monica’s prayers and example finally won her husband and mother-in-law to Christianity. Her husband died in 371, one year after his baptism. 
<p>Monica had at least three children who survived infancy. The oldest, Augustine (August 28) , is the most famous. At the time of his father’s death, Augustine was 17 and a rhetoric student in Carthage. Monica was distressed to learn that her son had accepted the Manichean heresy (all flesh is evil)  and was living an immoral life. For a while, she refused to let him eat or sleep in her house. Then one night she had a vision that assured her Augustine would return to the faith. From that time on, she stayed close to her son, praying and fasting for him. In fact, she often stayed much closer than Augustine wanted. </p><p>When he was 29, Augustine decided to go to Rome to teach rhetoric. Monica was determined to go along. One night he told his mother that he was going to the dock to say goodbye to a friend. Instead, he set sail for Rome. Monica was heartbroken when she learned of Augustine’s trick, but she still followed him. She arrived in Rome only to find that he had left for Milan. Although travel was difficult, Monica pursued him to Milan. </p><p>In Milan, Augustine came under the influence of the bishop, St. Ambrose, who also became Monica’s spiritual director. She accepted his advice in everything and had the humility to give up some practices that had become second nature to her (see Quote, below). Monica became a leader of the devout women in Milan as she had been in Tagaste. </p><p>She continued her prayers for Augustine during his years of instruction. At Easter, 387, St. Ambrose baptized Augustine and several of his friends. Soon after, his party left for Africa. Although no one else was aware of it, Monica knew her life was near the end. She told Augustine, “Son, nothing in this world now affords me delight. I do not know what there is now left for me to do or why I am still here, all my hopes in this world being now fulfilled.” She became ill shortly after and suffered severely for nine days before her death. </p><p>Almost all we know about St. Monica is in the writings of St. Augustine, especially his <i>Confessions</i>.</p> American Catholic Blog Heavenly Father, I am sure there are frequently tiny miracles where you protect us and are present to us although you always remain anonymous. Help me appreciate how carefully you watch over me and my loved ones all day long, and be sensitive enough to stay close to you. I ask this in Jesus's name. Amen.

 
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