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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Counselor

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Michael Fassbender and Penelope Cruz star in a scene from the movie "The Counselor."
A peepshow of human degradation, the ensemble drama "The Counselor" (Fox) alternates between glamorizing evil and parading its most torturous results—both physical and emotional—for shock value.

Working from the debut script of novelist-turned-screenwriter Cormac McCarthy, director Ridley Scott adds disdain for the Catholic Church and a debased view of human sexuality to a nihilist moral vision—with repellent results.

Ostensibly, this is meant to be a cautionary tale about essentially good people whose personality flaws lead them to dabble in darkness. The example at hand: the otherwise unnamed character of the title (Michael Fassbender), a previously legitimate lawyer out to make a quick jackpot through his involvement in a cross-border drug deal.

This new enterprise entangles our eponymous barrister with shady nightclub owner Reiner (Javier Bardem), Reiner's sociopathic girlfriend, Malkina (Cameron Diaz), and Westray (Brad Pitt), the streetwise middleman in the transaction.

At the other extreme of the Counselor's compartmentalized world stands the love of his life, Laura (Penelope Cruz). A practicing, though far from ideal, Catholic, Laura represents the film's sole embodiment of innocence.

When the hoped-for trade unexpectedly begins to unravel, however, the Mexican drug lords on the other side of the sale seek revenge, threatening doom not only for our errant attorney but for Laura as well.

From the extended bedroom encounter that opens the picture, to a scene in which Malkina goes to confession as a practical joke and on through various gory means of execution—one so creative it requires explanation in the dialogue—viewers run a gauntlet of unsettling material.

Our counsel? Spare yourself.

The film contains gruesome bloody violence, sacrilegious humor and ridicule of Catholicism, strong sexual content, including graphic premarital sexual activity and masturbation, numerous uses of profanity and frequent rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is O— morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Bede the Venerable: Bede is one of the few saints honored as such even during his lifetime. His writings were filled with such faith and learning that even while he was still alive, a Church council ordered them to be read publicly in the churches. 
<p>At an early age Bede was entrusted to the care of the abbot of the Monastery of St. Paul, Jarrow. The happy combination of genius and the instruction of scholarly, saintly monks produced a saint and an extraordinary scholar, perhaps the most outstanding one of his day. He was deeply versed in all the sciences of his times: natural philosophy, the philosophical principles of Aristotle, astronomy, arithmetic, grammar, ecclesiastical history, the lives of the saints and, especially, Holy Scripture.</p><p>From the time of his ordination to the priesthood at 30 (he had been ordained deacon at 19) till his death, he was ever occupied with learning, writing and teaching. Besides the many books that he copied, he composed 45 of his own, including 30 commentaries on books of the Bible. </p><p>Although eagerly sought by kings and other notables, even Pope Sergius, Bede managed to remain in his own monastery till his death. Only once did he leave for a few months in order to teach in the school of the archbishop of York. Bede died in 735 praying his favorite prayer: “Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As in the beginning, so now, and forever.” </p><p>His <i>Ecclesiastical History of the English People</i> is commonly regarded as of decisive importance in the art and science of writing history. A unique era was coming to an end at the time of Bede’s death: It had fulfilled its purpose of preparing Western Christianity to assimilate the non-Roman barbarian North. Bede recognized the opening to a new day in the life of the Church even as it was happening.</p> American Catholic Blog The truth is that suffering can be a beautiful thing, if we have the courage to trust God with everything, like Jesus did upon the cross.

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