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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

White House Down

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx star in a scene from the movie "White House Down."
In the hands of director Roland Emmerich, our nation's capital doesn't stand a chance.

Having laid waste to Washington by way of an alien invasion in "Independence Day" and via the Mayan apocalypse in "2012," he returns to form in "White House Down" (Columbia). This time, domestic terrorism is to blame for the swath of destruction along Pennsylvania Avenue.

Third time's a charm, however, as Emmerich has crafted a fast-paced thriller with heart -- but also with tongue firmly planted in cheek. Based on a clever screenplay by James Vanderbilt ("The Amazing Spider-Man"), "White House Down" never takes itself too seriously, injecting humor into a survival drama that crosses "Die Hard" with "Air Force One."

John Cale (Channing Tatum) is a member of the security detail protecting Speaker of the House Eli Raphelson (Richard Jenkins). His goal is to join the Secret Service and serve the president, James Sawyer (Jamie Foxx).

John's motivation is personal; he wants to impress his young daughter, Emily (Joey King), who is obsessed with politics and runs her own blog.

John arranges an interview with agent Carol Finnerty (Maggie Gyllenhaal) at the White House. He brings Emily along, and the child is agog with excitement. Unbeknownst to her, though, Dad does not get the job.

John and Emily decide to take the White House tour (this is pre-sequestration, of course). Prophetically, their guide points out a painting of the burning of the White House by British troops during the War of 1812.

Meanwhile, evil forces are at work inside the Capitol and at the White House, where a team of terrorists have gained entree disguised as workers installing a home theater for the first family.

Before you can say "House of Representatives," the Capitol dome blows up and mercenaries are swarming all over the executive mansion. Martin Walker (James Woods), head of White House security, grabs the president and they head down to the underground bunker.

Of course, tourists make easy hostages. John springs into action and escapes, but becomes separated from Emily. Still, the ingenious girl manages to do her bit: She uses her cell phone to upload video of the attack to the Internet, blowing the terrorists' cover.

Without spoiling the plot and its many twists, suffice it to say that, predictably, John winds up being the president's only friend and protector.

Amid the mayhem, "White House Down" gets a little preachy, slipping in talk about peace in the Middle East, the impact of war on combatants, and the political power wielded by military contractors and arms manufacturers. But these issues, important as they are, take a back seat to unabashed patriotism and the portrayal of heroic sacrifice for neighbor, family, and country.

The film contains much intense but mostly bloodless violence, a fleeting sexual image, and occasional crude and profane language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

- - -

McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.





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Joseph Calasanz: 
		<p>From Aragon, where he was born in 1556, to Rome, where he died 92 years later, fortune alternately smiled and frowned on the work of Joseph Calasanz. A priest with university training in canon law and theology, respected for his wisdom and administrative expertise, he put aside his career because he was deeply concerned with the need for education of poor children.</p>
		<p>When he was unable to get other institutes to undertake this apostolate at Rome, he and several companions personally provided a free school for deprived children. So overwhelming was the response that there was a constant need for larger facilities to house their effort. Soon Pope Clement VIII gave support to the school, and this aid continued under Pope Paul V. Other schools were opened; other men were attracted to the work and in 1621 the community (for so the teachers lived) was recognized as a religious community, the Clerks Regular of Religious Schools (Piarists or Scolopi). Not long after, Joseph was appointed superior for life.</p>
		<p>A combination of various prejudices and political ambition and maneuvering caused the institute much turmoil. Some did not favor educating the poor, for education would leave the poor dissatisfied with their lowly tasks for society! Others were shocked that some of the Piarists were sent for instruction to Galileo (a friend of Joseph) as superior, thus dividing the members into opposite camps. Repeatedly investigated by papal commissions, Joseph was demoted; when the struggle within the institute persisted, the Piarists were suppressed. Only after Joseph’s death were they formally recognized as a religious community.</p>
American Catholic Blog The Church’s motherhood is a spiritual reality that profoundly affects the lives of believers. In fact, the famous convert to Catholicism Cardinal John Henry Newman once said that it was through his reading and encounter with the Church of the Fathers that “I found my spiritual Mother.”

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