AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Great Gatsby

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan star in a scene from the movie "The Great Gatsby."
A great American novel doesn't always, it seems, translate into a sure-fire film property. A case in point: F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic 1925 tale, "The Great Gatsby."

Director and co-writer Baz Luhrmann's current 3-D adaptation (Warner Bros.) is at least the fourth effort to being Fitzgerald's chronicle of the Jazz Age to the big screen, the first of which dates back to the silent era.

Since that 1926 production -- helmed by Herbert Brenon -- has long been lost, it's impossible to assess its merits from this remove. But neither of its successors -- director Elliott Nugent's 1949 version starring Alan Ladd and Betty Field and Jack Clayton's 1974 release featuring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow -- generated much critical enthusiasm.

Despite its star power and a script by Francis Ford Coppola, Clayton's offering was widely regarded as pretty but listless. Though that's unlikely to be anyone's assessment of Luhrmann's film -- which is, if anything, overcharged and bursting at the seams -- there are other problems afoot.

In particular, Luhrmann's splashy, sometimes cartoonish approach to the material creates a fablelike setting that distances viewers from Fitzgerald's characters -- and thereby lessens the emotional impact of their downfall.

For those who failed to peruse even the Cliff Notes during high school or college, here's the setup: Narrator Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire), Mid-western-bred scion of the WASP establishment, moves to New York, becomes a tyro bond salesman and rents an inexpensive summer cottage on Long Island as a venue for weekend getaways.

His neighbor there, the occupant of a vast, fantastical mansion, is iconic self-made man and would-be social insider Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio). Gatsby's past is shadowy; so too is the source of his seemingly inexhaustible wealth.

Besides sharing the same neighborhood, Nick and Gatsby have something else in common as well: Nick's alluring cousin Daisy (Carey Mulligan), whom Gatsby, as a World War I-era G.I., once romanced and for whom he continues to carry an obsessively-blazing torch. There's just one difficulty: Daisy is now married to old-money millionaire and despicable cad Tom Buchanan (Joel Edgerton).

At Gatsby's request, Nick engineers a reunion for the duo, hardly guessing that the renewed connection will lead on, first to adultery, then to a disastrous confrontation with Tom and finally, through convoluted circumstances, to tragedy.

Luhrmann revels in the frenzied decadence of Gatsby's lifestyle, choreographing the riotous, gin-laden parties the mystery man hosts in a manner that suggests Busby Berkeley on hallucinogens.

Additionally, Luhrmann's script, penned in collaboration with Craig Pearce, tends to glamorize the sinful relationship at the heart of the story, suggesting that an unpleasant spouse and the inherent superiority of the illicit lovers are reason enough to ignore the Sixth Commandment.

As Gatsby himself might put it: Not so, old sport.

The film contains scenes of both lethal and nonlethal violence with minimal gore, an uncritical view of adultery, brief semi-graphic adulterous activity as well as some other sexual content, a glimpse of partial nudity, a few uses of profanity, a couple of crude terms and a religious slur. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Gianna Beretta Molla: 
		<p>In less than 40 years, Gianna Beretta Molla became a pediatric physician, a wife, a mother and a saint! </p>
		<p>She was born in Magenta (near Milano) as the 10th of Alberto and Maria’s 13 children. An active member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society, Gianna earned degrees in medicine and surgery from the University of Pavia and opened a clinic in Mesero. Gianna also enjoyed skiing and mountain climbing.</p>
		<p>Shortly before her 1955 marriage to Pietro Molla, Gianna wrote to him: “Love is the most beautiful sentiment that the Lord has put into the soul of men and women.” She and Peter had three children, Pierlluigi, Maria Zita and Laura. </p>
		<p>Early in the pregnancy for her fourth child, doctors discovered that Gianna had both a child and a tumor in her uterus. She allowed the surgeons to remove the tumor but not to perform the complete hysterectomy that they recommended, which would have killed the child. Seven months later, Gianna Emanuela was born, The following week Gianna Beretta Molla died in Monza of complications from childbirth. She is buried in Mesero.</p>
		<p>Gianna Emanuela went on to become a physician herself. Gianna Beretta Molla was beatified in 1994 and canonized 10 years later.</p>
American Catholic Blog Jesus will manifest Himself through us to each other and to the world, and by His love, others will know that we are His disciples. In spite of all our defects, God is in love with us and keeps using us to light the light of love and compassion in the world. So give Jesus a big smile and a hearty thank-you.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Third Sunday of Easter
We come to the Eucharistic feast as sons and daughters of the resurrection.

St. Benedict Joseph Labre
Born in France, this patron of the homeless was devoted to adoration of the Eucharist.

Pope Benedict XVI
Join Catholics around the world in offering prayers for our Pope Emeritus on his 88th birthday.

Adult Baptism
Continue to offer your prayers and encouragement to those who’ve joined your parish family this Easter.

I'm Sorry
Asking for forgiveness begins the healing process. Let a Catholic Greetings e-card help you take this first step.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015