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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Red Dawn

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Josh Peck, Josh Hutcherson and Chris Hemsworth star in a scene from the movie "Red Dawn."
Gleefully paranoid, hyperviolent and more than a little racist, the remake "Red Dawn" (FilmDistrict) is a time-waster for the tinfoil hat set.

The 1984 original pitted American youths against invading Russkies, to use the vintage term. It played out against the "Evil Empire" stage of the Cold War—a time when the Soviet Union was actually in decline, but both nations were still aiming considerable nuclear weaponry at each other, as they had done since the 1950s.

This time, director Dan Bradley and co-writers Carl Ellsworth and Jeremy Passmore launch a North Korean air invasion on the Pacific Northwest. The monolithic but clever commies have shut down the whole power grid using some secret technology. So, no TV, Internet or radio communications, except for what can be done with batteries.

Not a problem for a bunch of plucky teens led by ex-soldier Jed (Chris Hemsworth), son of Spokane Police Chief Tom Eckert (Brett Cullen). He and brother Matt (Josh Peck) transform pals Toni (Adrianna Palicki), Robert (Josh Hutcherson), Erica (Isabel Lucas) and Daryl (Connor Cruise)—along with some others -- into a stone-cold militia equally adept as snipers, insurgents and survivalists.

The commandoes nickname themselves the Wolverines, after their high school mascot. The Wolverines torment the occupiers for a good 90 minutes but never manage to overthrow them, since they have neither the requisite numbers nor the necessary firepower. They also deal harshly with collaborators.

Aided by the Russians, the North Koreans, we learn, have parachuted in and overtaken most of the United States except for a portion from Alabama to Arizona, and Michigan to Montana. (In this milieu, they don't mess with Texas.) Evidently, the Mexicans and Canadians aren't coming to anyone's rescue, let alone those Euro-wimps from NATO.

The Koreans are handing out summary executions, and the theme of the picture is laid out when Chief Eckert has a gun held to his head by Captain Lo (Will Yun Lee), the new local prefect.

"I want you to go to war and stop this (expletive)!" Eckert shouts to his sons, whom he knows are hiding in the vicinity, "Or die trying!"

So they fight 'em in the woods, and blow 'em up downtown. The only morality consists of getting the enemy before they get you, and skin color and eye shape largely determine who's evil.

The film contains constant gun violence, occasional gore, racist characterizations, fleeting profanity and pervasive crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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John of Capistrano: It has been said the Christian saints are the world’s greatest optimists. Not blind to the existence and consequences of evil, they base their confidence on the power of Christ’s redemption. The power of conversion through Christ extends not only to sinful people but also to calamitous events. 
<p>Imagine being born in the 14th century. One-third of the population and nearly 40 percent of the clergy were wiped out by the bubonic plague. The Western Schism split the Church with two or three claimants to the Holy See at one time. England and France were at war. The city-states of Italy were constantly in conflict. No wonder that gloom dominated the spirit of the culture and the times. </p><p>John Capistrano was born in 1386. His education was thorough. His talents and success were great. When he was 26 he was made governor of Perugia. Imprisoned after a battle against the Malatestas, he resolved to change his way of life completely. At the age of 30 he entered the Franciscan novitiate and was ordained a priest four years later. </p><p>His preaching attracted great throngs at a time of religious apathy and confusion. He and 12 Franciscan brethren were received in the countries of central Europe as angels of God. They were instrumental in reviving a dying faith and devotion. </p><p>The Franciscan Order itself was in turmoil over the interpretation and observance of the Rule of St. Francis. Through John’s tireless efforts and his expertise in law, the heretical Fraticelli were suppressed and the "Spirituals" were freed from interference in their stricter observance. </p><p>He helped bring about a reunion with the Greek and Armenian Churches, unfortunately only a brief arrangement. </p><p>When the Turks captured Constantinople in 1453, he was commissioned to preach a crusade for the defense of Europe. Gaining little response in Bavaria and Austria, he decided to concentrate his efforts in Hungary. He led the army to Belgrade. Under the great General John Hunyadi, they gained an overwhelming victory, and the siege of Belgrade was lifted. Worn out by his superhuman efforts, Capistrano was an easy prey to an infection after the battle. He died October 23, 1456.</p> American Catholic Blog When we are linked by the power of prayer, we as it were, hold each other’s hand as we walk side by side along a slippery path; and thus by the bounteous disposition of charity, it comes about that the harder each one leans on the other, the more firmly we are riveted together in brotherly love. —St. Gregory the Great

 
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