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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Argo

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Ben Affleck stars in and directs the critically acclaimed "Argo."
A tense, clandestine and quirky chapter in recent history is turned into an engrossing fact-based thriller in "Argo" (Warner Bros.).

Though serious themes and a surfeit of swearing make this drama suitable only for adults, mature viewers will find their fortitude in the face of exploding F-bombs rewarded by a positive treatment of marriage and a brief but telling salute to faith-based values.

Set against the backdrop of the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-81, "Argo" tells the story of CIA agent Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck). Tasked by his boss Jack O'Donnell (Bryan Cranston) with rescuing the handful of U.S. embassy employees who managed to escape capture when that facility was overrun by armed militants, Mendez hatches a seemingly far-fetched scheme: He'll smuggle them out of Tehran -- where they've been hiding in the Canadian embassy -- disguised as a Canadian film crew touring the Middle East to scout locations.

To make this outlandish cover convincing, Mendez enlists the help of veteran Hollywood producer Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin) and makeup artist John Chambers (John Goodman). Hurriedly, the trio works together to drum up publicity for the imaginary film project that gives this movie its title. The real script they're using is a characteristic Tinseltown artifact of the era: a second-rate rip-off of "Star Wars."

Affleck, who also directed, masterfully alternates between life-or-death drama and high-stakes humor. Though both aspects of the story too frequently give rise to coarse dialogue, the canny patriotism and emotional impact of the picture -- as scripted by Chris Terrio -- make for a rousing experience.

Even as he dedicatedly pursues his dangerous mission into hostile territory, Mendez is preoccupied by family problems. He and his wife have separated, and she's taken his young son away to live with her. Mendez maintains as much contact with both of them as he can, holding on to the distant prospect of a happy outcome.

As the fugitives he's been sent to help prepare to cooperate with Mendez' desperate plan, one of them quietly studies a prayer card with an image of the Infant of Prague on it. He then slips the card into the copy of the "Argo" screenplay he'll carry with him throughout the coming ordeal.

The implicit contrast between the innocence and gentleness conjured up by that widely beloved icon and the screaming hordes of religiously inflamed zealots who abuse their prisoners inside the violated embassy is a striking one. But the fundamental difference being highlighted may have more to do with the nature of civilized life itself than with the varieties of belief.

Either way, audiences will note who prevails.

The film contains potentially disturbing scenes and images, an abortion reference, a half-dozen uses of profanity as well as many rough and crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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James: This James is the brother of John the Evangelist. The two were called by Jesus as they worked with their father in a fishing boat on the Sea of Galilee. Jesus had already called another pair of brothers from a similar occupation: Peter and Andrew. “He walked along a little farther and saw James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They too were in a boat mending their nets. Then he called them. So they left their father Zebedee in the boat along with the hired men and followed him” (Mark 1:19-20). 
<p>James was one of the favored three who had the privilege of witnessing the Transfiguration, the raising to life of the daughter of Jairus and the agony in Gethsemani. </p><p>Two incidents in the Gospels describe the temperament of this man and his brother. St. Matthew tells that their mother came (Mark says it was the brothers themselves) to ask that they have the seats of honor (one on the right, one on the left of Jesus) in the kingdom. “Jesus said in reply, ‘You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup that I am going to drink?’ They said to him, ‘We can’” (Matthew 20:22). Jesus then told them they would indeed drink the cup and share his baptism of pain and death, but that sitting at his right hand or left was not his to give—it “is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father” (Matthew 20:23b). It remained to be seen how long it would take to realize the implications of their confident “We can!” </p><p>The other disciples became indignant at the ambition of James and John. Then Jesus taught them all the lesson of humble service: The purpose of authority is to serve. They are not to impose their will on others, or lord it over them. This is the position of Jesus himself. He was the servant of all; the service imposed on him was the supreme sacrifice of his own life. </p><p>On another occasion, James and John gave evidence that the nickname Jesus gave them—“sons of thunder”—was an apt one. The Samaritans would not welcome Jesus because he was on his way to hated Jerusalem. “When the disciples James and John saw this they asked, ‘Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?’ Jesus turned and rebuked them...” (Luke 9:54-55). </p><p>James was apparently the first of the apostles to be martyred. “About that time King Herod laid hands upon some members of the church to harm them. He had James, the brother of John, killed by the sword, and when he saw that this was pleasing to the Jews he proceeded to arrest Peter also” (Acts 12:1-3a). </p><p>This James, sometimes called James the Greater, is not to be confused with James the Lesser (May 3) or with the author of the Letter of James and the leader of the Jerusalem community.</p> American Catholic Blog We don’t need so much to talk about God but to allow people to feel how God lives within us, that’s our work.

 
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