Skip Navigation Links
Catholic News
Special Reports
Google Plus
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments


John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

Ben Affleck stars in and directs the critically acclaimed "Argo."
A tense, clandestine and quirky chapter in recent history is turned into an engrossing fact-based thriller in "Argo" (Warner Bros.).

Though serious themes and a surfeit of swearing make this drama suitable only for adults, mature viewers will find their fortitude in the face of exploding F-bombs rewarded by a positive treatment of marriage and a brief but telling salute to faith-based values.

Set against the backdrop of the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-81, "Argo" tells the story of CIA agent Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck). Tasked by his boss Jack O'Donnell (Bryan Cranston) with rescuing the handful of U.S. embassy employees who managed to escape capture when that facility was overrun by armed militants, Mendez hatches a seemingly far-fetched scheme: He'll smuggle them out of Tehran -- where they've been hiding in the Canadian embassy -- disguised as a Canadian film crew touring the Middle East to scout locations.

To make this outlandish cover convincing, Mendez enlists the help of veteran Hollywood producer Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin) and makeup artist John Chambers (John Goodman). Hurriedly, the trio works together to drum up publicity for the imaginary film project that gives this movie its title. The real script they're using is a characteristic Tinseltown artifact of the era: a second-rate rip-off of "Star Wars."

Affleck, who also directed, masterfully alternates between life-or-death drama and high-stakes humor. Though both aspects of the story too frequently give rise to coarse dialogue, the canny patriotism and emotional impact of the picture -- as scripted by Chris Terrio -- make for a rousing experience.

Even as he dedicatedly pursues his dangerous mission into hostile territory, Mendez is preoccupied by family problems. He and his wife have separated, and she's taken his young son away to live with her. Mendez maintains as much contact with both of them as he can, holding on to the distant prospect of a happy outcome.

As the fugitives he's been sent to help prepare to cooperate with Mendez' desperate plan, one of them quietly studies a prayer card with an image of the Infant of Prague on it. He then slips the card into the copy of the "Argo" screenplay he'll carry with him throughout the coming ordeal.

The implicit contrast between the innocence and gentleness conjured up by that widely beloved icon and the screaming hordes of religiously inflamed zealots who abuse their prisoners inside the violated embassy is a striking one. But the fundamental difference being highlighted may have more to do with the nature of civilized life itself than with the varieties of belief.

Either way, audiences will note who prevails.

The film contains potentially disturbing scenes and images, an abortion reference, a half-dozen uses of profanity as well as many rough and crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III -- adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R -- restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.

Search reviews at

Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Marie-Rose Durocher: Canada was one diocese from coast to coast during the first eight years of Marie-Rose Durocher’s life. Its half-million Catholics had received civil and religious liberty from the English only 44 years before. When Marie-Rose was 29, Bishop Ignace Bourget became bishop of Montreal. He would be a decisive influence in her life. 
<p>He faced a shortage of priests and sisters and a rural population that had been largely deprived of education. Like his counterparts in the United States, he scoured Europe for help and himself founded four communities, one of which was the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. Its first sister and reluctant co-foundress was Marie-Rose. </p><p>She was born in a little village near Montreal in 1811, the 10th of 11 children. She had a good education, was something of a tomboy, rode a horse named Caesar and could have married well. At 16, she felt the desire to become a religious but was forced to abandon the idea because of her weak constitution. At 18, when her mother died, her priest brother invited her and her father to come to his parish in Beloeil, not far from Montreal. For 13 years she served as housekeeper, hostess and parish worker. She became well known for her graciousness, courtesy, leadership and tact; she was, in fact, called “the saint of Beloeil.” Perhaps she was too tactful during two years when her brother treated her coldly. </p><p>As a young woman she had hoped there would someday be a community of teaching sisters in every parish, never thinking she would found one. But her spiritual director, Father Pierre Telmon, O.M.I., after thoroughly (and severely) leading her in the spiritual life, urged her to found a community herself. Bishop Bourget concurred, but Marie-Rose shrank from the prospect. She was in poor health and her father and her brother needed her. </p><p>She finally agreed and, with two friends, Melodie Dufresne and Henriette Cere, entered a little home in Longueuil, across the Saint Lawrence River from Montreal. With them were 13 young girls already assembled for boarding school. Longueuil became successively her Bethlehem, Nazareth and Gethsemani. She was 32 and would live only six more years—years filled with poverty, trials, sickness and slander. The qualities she had nurtured in her “hidden” life came forward—a strong will, intelligence and common sense, great inner courage and yet a great deference to directors. Thus was born an international congregation of women religious dedicated to education in the faith. </p><p>She was severe with herself and by today’s standards quite strict with her sisters. Beneath it all, of course, was an unshakable love of her crucified Savior. </p><p>On her deathbed the prayers most frequently on her lips were “Jesus, Mary, Joseph! Sweet Jesus, I love you. Jesus, be to me Jesus!” Before she died, she smiled and said to the sister with her, “Your prayers are keeping me here—let me go.” </p><p>She was beatified in 1982.</p> American Catholic Blog It is in them [the saints] that Christian love becomes credible; they are the poor sinners’ guiding stars. But every one of them wishes to point completely away from himself and toward love…. The genuine saints desired nothing but the greater glory of God’s love… <br />—Hans Urs von Balthasar

Oasis Conversion Stories of Hollywood Legends

St. Gerard Majella
Many expectant mothers are comforted by trust in this saint’s prayers and intercession.

The day you were born is worth celebrating!

Thank You
Show someone your gratitude for their kindness with a Catholic Greetings e-card.

St. Daniel Comboni
The congregation founded by this Italian priest is known for spreading the Gospel throughout mission lands.

Synod on the Family
Pray that God will help the bishops meeting in Rome this month encourage families to draw closer to him.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic

An Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2015